Sequence matters

A more effective way to use advertising and publicity

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research is twofold: (1) to examine the persuasive effects of a message that is presented either as advertising or publicity, and (2) to study whether sequencing (i.e., advertising-then-publicity or publicity-then-advertising) matters in integrated marketing. Specifically, this research tests (1) whether there is a difference between advertising and publicity on message acceptance and message response, and (2) whether the sequencing of publicity and advertising affects message processing. Four dependent variables are studied: message strength, perceived credibility, attitude toward the destination, and purchase intent. Results suggest that the sequence, publicity-then-advertising, is most effective at persuading potential customers to visit a tourist destination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-372
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Advertising Research
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

publicity
Marketing
credibility
purchase
Publicity
tourist
marketing
customer
acceptance
Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Marketing

Cite this

Sequence matters : A more effective way to use advertising and publicity. / Loda, Marsha D; Coleman, Barbara Carrick.

In: Journal of Advertising Research, Vol. 45, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 362-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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