Serologic markers of viral hepatitis A, B, C, and D in patients with hemophilia

Ashir Kumar, Roshni Kulkarni, Dennis L Murray, Renuka Gera, Ajovi B. Scott‐Emuakpor, Kathy Bosma, John A. Penner

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Abstract

Forty‐one patients with hemophilia A were studied for the prevalence of serological markers for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C (non‐A and non‐B hepatitis), and delta hepatitis (hepatitis D). Ten of 41 (24.4%) patients demonstrated hepatitis A antibody and 31 of 41 (75.6%) patients had a serologic marker for previous hepatitis B infection; four of these 31 patients (13%) also demonstrated antibody to delta agent (hepatitis D). Thirty‐seven of 41 (90.2%) patients demonstrated antibody for hepatitis C. Nine of 31 (29%) patients with a hepatitis B marker (no hepatitis B vaccinees) were negative for anti‐HBc but positive for anti‐HBs; all of these nine patients were HIV antibody positive, although they had no overt immunodeficiency. Twenty‐six of 41 (63.5%) patients were HIV antibody positive. Of HIV antibody positive patients, 27%, 88%, and 100% demonstrated evidence of a previous hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C, respectively. Of HIV antibody negative patients; 20%, 53%, and 73% of the patients demonstrated evidence of a previous hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C infections, respectively. The difference between HIV antibody positive and HIV antibody negative groups was not significant for hepatitis A but was significant for hepatitis B (P < 0.001) and hepatitis C (P < .001). Of the 31 patients with a hepatitis B serologic marker, all had antibody to hepatitis C. Of 10 patients, without a hepatitis B serologic marker, only 6 (60%) had antibody to hepatitis C. Clinically, none of our patients demonstrated any evidence of liver disease; however, 10 patients reported a previous history of hepatitis. These data suggest that patients with hemophilia in the United States, particularly those with HIV antibody, have high prevalence of hepatitis B and C infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-209
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Virology
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Hepatitis A
Hemophilia A
Hepatitis B
Biomarkers
HIV Antibodies
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Hepatitis D
Hepatitis
Infection
Hepatitis A Antibodies
Hepatitis Delta Virus

Keywords

  • HIV infection
  • delta hepatitis
  • hemophilia
  • hepatitis A
  • hepatitis B
  • hepatitis C
  • viral hepatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Kumar, A., Kulkarni, R., Murray, D. L., Gera, R., Scott‐Emuakpor, A. B., Bosma, K., & Penner, J. A. (1993). Serologic markers of viral hepatitis A, B, C, and D in patients with hemophilia. Journal of Medical Virology, 41(3), 205-209. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.1890410307

Serologic markers of viral hepatitis A, B, C, and D in patients with hemophilia. / Kumar, Ashir; Kulkarni, Roshni; Murray, Dennis L; Gera, Renuka; Scott‐Emuakpor, Ajovi B.; Bosma, Kathy; Penner, John A.

In: Journal of Medical Virology, Vol. 41, No. 3, 01.01.1993, p. 205-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kumar, A, Kulkarni, R, Murray, DL, Gera, R, Scott‐Emuakpor, AB, Bosma, K & Penner, JA 1993, 'Serologic markers of viral hepatitis A, B, C, and D in patients with hemophilia', Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 41, no. 3, pp. 205-209. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.1890410307
Kumar A, Kulkarni R, Murray DL, Gera R, Scott‐Emuakpor AB, Bosma K et al. Serologic markers of viral hepatitis A, B, C, and D in patients with hemophilia. Journal of Medical Virology. 1993 Jan 1;41(3):205-209. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.1890410307
Kumar, Ashir ; Kulkarni, Roshni ; Murray, Dennis L ; Gera, Renuka ; Scott‐Emuakpor, Ajovi B. ; Bosma, Kathy ; Penner, John A. / Serologic markers of viral hepatitis A, B, C, and D in patients with hemophilia. In: Journal of Medical Virology. 1993 ; Vol. 41, No. 3. pp. 205-209.
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abstract = "Forty‐one patients with hemophilia A were studied for the prevalence of serological markers for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C (non‐A and non‐B hepatitis), and delta hepatitis (hepatitis D). Ten of 41 (24.4{\%}) patients demonstrated hepatitis A antibody and 31 of 41 (75.6{\%}) patients had a serologic marker for previous hepatitis B infection; four of these 31 patients (13{\%}) also demonstrated antibody to delta agent (hepatitis D). Thirty‐seven of 41 (90.2{\%}) patients demonstrated antibody for hepatitis C. Nine of 31 (29{\%}) patients with a hepatitis B marker (no hepatitis B vaccinees) were negative for anti‐HBc but positive for anti‐HBs; all of these nine patients were HIV antibody positive, although they had no overt immunodeficiency. Twenty‐six of 41 (63.5{\%}) patients were HIV antibody positive. Of HIV antibody positive patients, 27{\%}, 88{\%}, and 100{\%} demonstrated evidence of a previous hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C, respectively. Of HIV antibody negative patients; 20{\%}, 53{\%}, and 73{\%} of the patients demonstrated evidence of a previous hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C infections, respectively. The difference between HIV antibody positive and HIV antibody negative groups was not significant for hepatitis A but was significant for hepatitis B (P < 0.001) and hepatitis C (P < .001). Of the 31 patients with a hepatitis B serologic marker, all had antibody to hepatitis C. Of 10 patients, without a hepatitis B serologic marker, only 6 (60{\%}) had antibody to hepatitis C. Clinically, none of our patients demonstrated any evidence of liver disease; however, 10 patients reported a previous history of hepatitis. These data suggest that patients with hemophilia in the United States, particularly those with HIV antibody, have high prevalence of hepatitis B and C infections.",
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