Serum sclerostin in vascular calcification and clinical outcome in chronic kidney disease

Cong Zeng, Chunyuan Guo, Juan Cai, Chengyuan Tang, Zheng Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sclerostin, a potent soluble inhibitor of the Wnt signalling pathway, is known to inhibit bone formation by suppressing osteocytes differentiation and function. Patients with chronic kidney disease have high levels of serum sclerostin. Sclerostin has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification, which may promote the cardiovascular events of morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease patients. However, the role of sclerostin in vascular calcification and clinical prognosis in chronic kidney disease remains elusive. While some studies suggested a positive correlation between serum sclerostin and vascular calcification or clinical outcome, other studies showed no or even negative correlation between them. Small sample size, heterogeneity in enrolled patients, discrepancy in anatomical structure examined and differences in the applied assays may be responsible for the discrepant results. Nonetheless, anti-sclerostin antibodies may be a new therapeutic approach to increase bone mass and strength in chronic kidney disease. This review aims to have a better understanding of the relationship of serum sclerostin with vascular calcification and clinical outcome in chronic kidney disease patients, and propose the application of anti-sclerostin therapy in chronic kidney disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-105
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes and Vascular Disease Research
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Wnt
  • sclerostin
  • vascular calcification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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