Severe glenoid retroversion is best treated with asymmetric reaming in total shoulder arthroplasty-Opposes

Daniel L. Maxwell, Lynn A Crosby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Degenerative arthritis of the shoulder is a common orthopaedic condition, and the number of total shoulder arthroplasty procedures is increasing with the aging population. During total shoulder arthroplasty, reconstruction of the glenoid side of the joint can be particularly difficult in the face of posterior wear or excessive retroversion. Treatment options for posterior wear or excessive retroversion of the glenoid include asymmetric reaming of the high anterior side, bone grafting, or posterior augmentation of the glenoid component. A posterior augmented glenoid component allows the surgeon to maintain bone stock while correcting the posterior deficiency of the glenoid and avoiding the potential for medialization of the humeral component with anterior high side reaming. Bone grafting can be beneficial but relies on graft healing to successfully obtain stability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-261
Number of pages3
JournalSeminars in Arthroplasty
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • Computerized tomography
  • Glenoid augments
  • Retroversion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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