Sex and the renin-angiotensin system

Inequality between the sexes in response to RAS stimulation and inhibition

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

105 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this review is to examine sex differences in response to stimulation and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The RAS plays a prominent role in the development of chronic renal disease, and there are known sex differences not only in the expression level of components of the RAS but also in how males and females respond to perturbations of the RAS. In men, renal injury increases in parallel with increased activation of the RAS, while in women, increases in ANG II do not necessarily translate into increases in renal injury. Moreover, both epidemiological and experimental studies have noted sex differences in the therapeutic benefits following angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin receptor blocker treatment. Despite these differences, RAS inhibitors are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of chronic renal disease, irrespective of sex. This review will examine how males and females respond to stimulation and inhibition of the RAS, with a focus on renal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume294
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

Fingerprint

Renin-Angiotensin System
Sex Characteristics
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Kidney
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Wounds and Injuries
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Epidemiologic Studies
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Angiotensin receptor blocker
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors
  • Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription
  • Nuclear factor-κβ
  • Transforming growth factor-β

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of this review is to examine sex differences in response to stimulation and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The RAS plays a prominent role in the development of chronic renal disease, and there are known sex differences not only in the expression level of components of the RAS but also in how males and females respond to perturbations of the RAS. In men, renal injury increases in parallel with increased activation of the RAS, while in women, increases in ANG II do not necessarily translate into increases in renal injury. Moreover, both epidemiological and experimental studies have noted sex differences in the therapeutic benefits following angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin receptor blocker treatment. Despite these differences, RAS inhibitors are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of chronic renal disease, irrespective of sex. This review will examine how males and females respond to stimulation and inhibition of the RAS, with a focus on renal disease.",
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