Sex differences in leptin control of cardiovascular function in health and metabolic diseases

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Leptin, the adipocyte-derived hormone identified in 1994 for its major role in the control of satiety and body weight regulation, is an adipokine secreted in a sex-specific manner. Although it has clearly been established that females secrete three to four times more leptin than males and that this sexual dimorphism in leptin secretion is exacerbated with overweight and obesity, the origin and the physiological consequences of this sexual dimorphism remain ill-defined. The adipose tissue is the major site of leptin secretion; however, leptin receptors are ubiquitously expressed, conferring to leptin, and indirectly to the adipose tissue, a potential role in the control of numerous physiological functions. Besides its major role in the control of food intake and energy expenditure, leptin has been shown to contribute to the control of immune, bone, reproductive, and cardiovascular functions. The goal of the present chapter is to review and discuss the current knowledge on the contribution of leptin to the control of cardiovascular function while focusing on the impact of the sexual dimorphism in leptin secretion and of the pathological increases in leptin levels induced by overweight and obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages87-111
Number of pages25
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1043
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Metabolic Diseases
Leptin
Sex Characteristics
Health
Adipose Tissue
Obesity
Tissue
Leptin Receptors
Adipokines
Adipocytes
Energy Metabolism
Bone
Eating
Body Weight
Hormones
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Belin de Chantemele, E. J. (2017). Sex differences in leptin control of cardiovascular function in health and metabolic diseases. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (pp. 87-111). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1043). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70178-3_6

Sex differences in leptin control of cardiovascular function in health and metabolic diseases. / Belin de Chantemele, Eric Jacques.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2017. p. 87-111 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1043).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Belin de Chantemele, EJ 2017, Sex differences in leptin control of cardiovascular function in health and metabolic diseases. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1043, Springer New York LLC, pp. 87-111. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70178-3_6
Belin de Chantemele EJ. Sex differences in leptin control of cardiovascular function in health and metabolic diseases. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC. 2017. p. 87-111. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70178-3_6
Belin de Chantemele, Eric Jacques. / Sex differences in leptin control of cardiovascular function in health and metabolic diseases. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2017. pp. 87-111 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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