Short-term mesh exposure after robotic sacrocolpopexy with and without concomitant hysterectomy

Andrea K. Crane, Elizabeth J. Geller, Stephanie Sullivan, Barbara Robinson Henley, Erinn M. Myers, Christine Horton, Catherine A. Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to compare the short-term rate of mesh exposure after a robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSCP) compared with those after RSCP with a concomitant hysterectomy. Secondary objectives included a comparison of mesh exposure from total hysterectomies (TH) versus supracervical hysterectomies (SCH) and determination of risk factors for mesh exposure. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent RSCP between January 2009 and December 2011 at one academic center. The primary outcome was mesh exposure at 6 weeks postoperation. Subjects were divided into two groups: those with concomitant hysterectomy and those with RSCP alone. The hysterectomy group was subdivided into TH versus SCH. Mesh exposures and mesh revision procedures were identified using International Classification of Diseases-9 and CPT codes, respectively, and confirmed by chart review. Results: There were 230 eligible women who underwent RSCP during the study period and were followed up at a 6-week postoperative visit; 118 (51.7%) had RSCP only and 112 (48.7%) had a concomitant hysterectomy. Of those who underwent hysterectomy, 79 patients (70.5%) had TH and 33 (29.5%) had SCH. There were nine (3.9%) mesh exposures attributed to RSCP. The difference between the RSCP + hysterectomy group and the RSCP-only group was 2.7% versus 5.1% (P = 0.50). The 2.7% of mesh exposures in the hysterectomy group were associated with TH and none with SCH, but this difference was not significant (P = 0.55). Conclusions: Although mesh exposure with RSCP is low, serious morbidity can be associated with mesh use and appropriate preoperative counseling is critical.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-606
Number of pages4
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume107
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Robotics
Hysterectomy
Current Procedural Terminology
International Classification of Diseases
Counseling

Keywords

  • Mesh exposure
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Robotic sacrocolpopexy
  • Supracervical hysterectomy
  • Total hysterectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Short-term mesh exposure after robotic sacrocolpopexy with and without concomitant hysterectomy. / Crane, Andrea K.; Geller, Elizabeth J.; Sullivan, Stephanie; Henley, Barbara Robinson; Myers, Erinn M.; Horton, Christine; Matthews, Catherine A.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 107, No. 10, 01.01.2014, p. 603-606.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crane, Andrea K. ; Geller, Elizabeth J. ; Sullivan, Stephanie ; Henley, Barbara Robinson ; Myers, Erinn M. ; Horton, Christine ; Matthews, Catherine A. / Short-term mesh exposure after robotic sacrocolpopexy with and without concomitant hysterectomy. In: Southern Medical Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 107, No. 10. pp. 603-606.
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abstract = "Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to compare the short-term rate of mesh exposure after a robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSCP) compared with those after RSCP with a concomitant hysterectomy. Secondary objectives included a comparison of mesh exposure from total hysterectomies (TH) versus supracervical hysterectomies (SCH) and determination of risk factors for mesh exposure. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent RSCP between January 2009 and December 2011 at one academic center. The primary outcome was mesh exposure at 6 weeks postoperation. Subjects were divided into two groups: those with concomitant hysterectomy and those with RSCP alone. The hysterectomy group was subdivided into TH versus SCH. Mesh exposures and mesh revision procedures were identified using International Classification of Diseases-9 and CPT codes, respectively, and confirmed by chart review. Results: There were 230 eligible women who underwent RSCP during the study period and were followed up at a 6-week postoperative visit; 118 (51.7{\%}) had RSCP only and 112 (48.7{\%}) had a concomitant hysterectomy. Of those who underwent hysterectomy, 79 patients (70.5{\%}) had TH and 33 (29.5{\%}) had SCH. There were nine (3.9{\%}) mesh exposures attributed to RSCP. The difference between the RSCP + hysterectomy group and the RSCP-only group was 2.7{\%} versus 5.1{\%} (P = 0.50). The 2.7{\%} of mesh exposures in the hysterectomy group were associated with TH and none with SCH, but this difference was not significant (P = 0.55). Conclusions: Although mesh exposure with RSCP is low, serious morbidity can be associated with mesh use and appropriate preoperative counseling is critical.",
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T1 - Short-term mesh exposure after robotic sacrocolpopexy with and without concomitant hysterectomy

AU - Crane, Andrea K.

AU - Geller, Elizabeth J.

AU - Sullivan, Stephanie

AU - Henley, Barbara Robinson

AU - Myers, Erinn M.

AU - Horton, Christine

AU - Matthews, Catherine A.

PY - 2014/1/1

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N2 - Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to compare the short-term rate of mesh exposure after a robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSCP) compared with those after RSCP with a concomitant hysterectomy. Secondary objectives included a comparison of mesh exposure from total hysterectomies (TH) versus supracervical hysterectomies (SCH) and determination of risk factors for mesh exposure. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent RSCP between January 2009 and December 2011 at one academic center. The primary outcome was mesh exposure at 6 weeks postoperation. Subjects were divided into two groups: those with concomitant hysterectomy and those with RSCP alone. The hysterectomy group was subdivided into TH versus SCH. Mesh exposures and mesh revision procedures were identified using International Classification of Diseases-9 and CPT codes, respectively, and confirmed by chart review. Results: There were 230 eligible women who underwent RSCP during the study period and were followed up at a 6-week postoperative visit; 118 (51.7%) had RSCP only and 112 (48.7%) had a concomitant hysterectomy. Of those who underwent hysterectomy, 79 patients (70.5%) had TH and 33 (29.5%) had SCH. There were nine (3.9%) mesh exposures attributed to RSCP. The difference between the RSCP + hysterectomy group and the RSCP-only group was 2.7% versus 5.1% (P = 0.50). The 2.7% of mesh exposures in the hysterectomy group were associated with TH and none with SCH, but this difference was not significant (P = 0.55). Conclusions: Although mesh exposure with RSCP is low, serious morbidity can be associated with mesh use and appropriate preoperative counseling is critical.

AB - Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to compare the short-term rate of mesh exposure after a robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSCP) compared with those after RSCP with a concomitant hysterectomy. Secondary objectives included a comparison of mesh exposure from total hysterectomies (TH) versus supracervical hysterectomies (SCH) and determination of risk factors for mesh exposure. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent RSCP between January 2009 and December 2011 at one academic center. The primary outcome was mesh exposure at 6 weeks postoperation. Subjects were divided into two groups: those with concomitant hysterectomy and those with RSCP alone. The hysterectomy group was subdivided into TH versus SCH. Mesh exposures and mesh revision procedures were identified using International Classification of Diseases-9 and CPT codes, respectively, and confirmed by chart review. Results: There were 230 eligible women who underwent RSCP during the study period and were followed up at a 6-week postoperative visit; 118 (51.7%) had RSCP only and 112 (48.7%) had a concomitant hysterectomy. Of those who underwent hysterectomy, 79 patients (70.5%) had TH and 33 (29.5%) had SCH. There were nine (3.9%) mesh exposures attributed to RSCP. The difference between the RSCP + hysterectomy group and the RSCP-only group was 2.7% versus 5.1% (P = 0.50). The 2.7% of mesh exposures in the hysterectomy group were associated with TH and none with SCH, but this difference was not significant (P = 0.55). Conclusions: Although mesh exposure with RSCP is low, serious morbidity can be associated with mesh use and appropriate preoperative counseling is critical.

KW - Mesh exposure

KW - Pelvic organ prolapse

KW - Robotic sacrocolpopexy

KW - Supracervical hysterectomy

KW - Total hysterectomy

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