Skills-based residency training in alcohol screening and brief intervention

Results from the georgia-texas improving brief intervention project

J. Paul Seale, Mary M. Velasquez, J Aaron Johnson, Sylvia Shellenberger, Kirk Von Sternberg, Carrie Dodrill, John M. Boltri, Roy Takei, Denice Clark, Daniel Grace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alcohol screening and brief intervention (SBI) is recommended for all primary care patients but is underutilized. This project trained 111 residents and faculty in 8 family medicine residencies to conduct SBI and implement SBI protocols in residency clinics, then assessed changes in self-reported importance and confidence in performing SBI and brief intervention (BI) rates. Clinicians reported significant increases in role security, confidence, and ability to help drinkers reduce drinking and decreased importance of factors that might dissuade them from performing SBI. Stage of change measures indicated 37% of clinicians progressed toward action or maintenance in performing SBI; however, numbers of reported BIs did not increase. At all time points, 33% to 36% of clinicians reported BIs with 10% of the last 50 patients. Future studies should focus on increasing intervention rates using more patient-centered BI approaches, quality improvement approaches, and systems changes that could increase opportunities for performing BIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-271
Number of pages11
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Internship and Residency
Alcohols
Aptitude
Quality Improvement
Drinking
Primary Health Care
Maintenance
Medicine

Keywords

  • Alcohol screening
  • attitudes of health personnel
  • brief intervention
  • internship and residency
  • medical education
  • program evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Skills-based residency training in alcohol screening and brief intervention : Results from the georgia-texas improving brief intervention project. / Paul Seale, J.; Velasquez, Mary M.; Johnson, J Aaron; Shellenberger, Sylvia; Von Sternberg, Kirk; Dodrill, Carrie; Boltri, John M.; Takei, Roy; Clark, Denice; Grace, Daniel.

In: Substance Abuse, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.07.2012, p. 261-271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paul Seale, J, Velasquez, MM, Johnson, JA, Shellenberger, S, Von Sternberg, K, Dodrill, C, Boltri, JM, Takei, R, Clark, D & Grace, D 2012, 'Skills-based residency training in alcohol screening and brief intervention: Results from the georgia-texas improving brief intervention project', Substance Abuse, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 261-271. https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2011.640187
Paul Seale, J. ; Velasquez, Mary M. ; Johnson, J Aaron ; Shellenberger, Sylvia ; Von Sternberg, Kirk ; Dodrill, Carrie ; Boltri, John M. ; Takei, Roy ; Clark, Denice ; Grace, Daniel. / Skills-based residency training in alcohol screening and brief intervention : Results from the georgia-texas improving brief intervention project. In: Substance Abuse. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 261-271.
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