Sleep disturbances in psoriasis

Brandon G. Shutty, Cameron West, Karen E. Huang, Erin Landis, Tushar Dabade, Betsy Browder, Jenna O'Neill, Megan A. Kinney, Ashley N. Feneran, Sarah Taylor, Brad Yentzer, William Vaughn McCall, Alan B. Fleischer, Steven R. Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Psoriasis negatively impacts sleep, but the factors that cause this sleep disturbance are not well characterized. PURPOSE: To assess sleep quality in subjects with psoriasis. METHODS: 35 outpatients diagnosed with chronic plaque psoriasis affecting at least 10 percent BSA and 44 controls completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Patient Health Questionnaire, Itch Severity Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. For multiple testing, alpha was set at 0.008. RESULTS: Adjusting for age, BMI, and gender, patients with psoriasis had 4.3 times the odds to score in a higher insomnia category (OR 95% CI: 1.7, 11.2; p=0.01), a trend toward experiencing poor sleep (p=0.04), and no difference in odds to be sleepy (p=0.83). Patients with psoriasis had greater itch than those without psoriasis (mean ISS 8.5 vs. 2.0; p<0.0001). When adjusting for age, BMI, gender, and depression, those with psoriasis were not more likely to experience poor sleep quality (p=0.25), nor to score in a higher insomnia category (p=0.20) or be more sleepy (p=0.53). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with psoriasis suffer from sleep disturbances and pruritus more than those without psoriasis. Although sleep disturbances are more prevalent, this may be secondary to depression rather than related to a direct effect of psoriasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalDermatology Online Journal
Volume19
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Psoriasis
Sleep
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Depression
Pruritus
Outpatients
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Shutty, B. G., West, C., Huang, K. E., Landis, E., Dabade, T., Browder, B., ... Feldman, S. R. (2013). Sleep disturbances in psoriasis. Dermatology Online Journal, 19(1).

Sleep disturbances in psoriasis. / Shutty, Brandon G.; West, Cameron; Huang, Karen E.; Landis, Erin; Dabade, Tushar; Browder, Betsy; O'Neill, Jenna; Kinney, Megan A.; Feneran, Ashley N.; Taylor, Sarah; Yentzer, Brad; McCall, William Vaughn; Fleischer, Alan B.; Feldman, Steven R.

In: Dermatology Online Journal, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shutty, BG, West, C, Huang, KE, Landis, E, Dabade, T, Browder, B, O'Neill, J, Kinney, MA, Feneran, AN, Taylor, S, Yentzer, B, McCall, WV, Fleischer, AB & Feldman, SR 2013, 'Sleep disturbances in psoriasis', Dermatology Online Journal, vol. 19, no. 1.
Shutty BG, West C, Huang KE, Landis E, Dabade T, Browder B et al. Sleep disturbances in psoriasis. Dermatology Online Journal. 2013 Jan 1;19(1).
Shutty, Brandon G. ; West, Cameron ; Huang, Karen E. ; Landis, Erin ; Dabade, Tushar ; Browder, Betsy ; O'Neill, Jenna ; Kinney, Megan A. ; Feneran, Ashley N. ; Taylor, Sarah ; Yentzer, Brad ; McCall, William Vaughn ; Fleischer, Alan B. ; Feldman, Steven R. / Sleep disturbances in psoriasis. In: Dermatology Online Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Psoriasis negatively impacts sleep, but the factors that cause this sleep disturbance are not well characterized. PURPOSE: To assess sleep quality in subjects with psoriasis. METHODS: 35 outpatients diagnosed with chronic plaque psoriasis affecting at least 10 percent BSA and 44 controls completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Patient Health Questionnaire, Itch Severity Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. For multiple testing, alpha was set at 0.008. RESULTS: Adjusting for age, BMI, and gender, patients with psoriasis had 4.3 times the odds to score in a higher insomnia category (OR 95{\%} CI: 1.7, 11.2; p=0.01), a trend toward experiencing poor sleep (p=0.04), and no difference in odds to be sleepy (p=0.83). Patients with psoriasis had greater itch than those without psoriasis (mean ISS 8.5 vs. 2.0; p<0.0001). When adjusting for age, BMI, gender, and depression, those with psoriasis were not more likely to experience poor sleep quality (p=0.25), nor to score in a higher insomnia category (p=0.20) or be more sleepy (p=0.53). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with psoriasis suffer from sleep disturbances and pruritus more than those without psoriasis. Although sleep disturbances are more prevalent, this may be secondary to depression rather than related to a direct effect of psoriasis.",
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AU - Kinney, Megan A.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Psoriasis negatively impacts sleep, but the factors that cause this sleep disturbance are not well characterized. PURPOSE: To assess sleep quality in subjects with psoriasis. METHODS: 35 outpatients diagnosed with chronic plaque psoriasis affecting at least 10 percent BSA and 44 controls completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Patient Health Questionnaire, Itch Severity Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. For multiple testing, alpha was set at 0.008. RESULTS: Adjusting for age, BMI, and gender, patients with psoriasis had 4.3 times the odds to score in a higher insomnia category (OR 95% CI: 1.7, 11.2; p=0.01), a trend toward experiencing poor sleep (p=0.04), and no difference in odds to be sleepy (p=0.83). Patients with psoriasis had greater itch than those without psoriasis (mean ISS 8.5 vs. 2.0; p<0.0001). When adjusting for age, BMI, gender, and depression, those with psoriasis were not more likely to experience poor sleep quality (p=0.25), nor to score in a higher insomnia category (p=0.20) or be more sleepy (p=0.53). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with psoriasis suffer from sleep disturbances and pruritus more than those without psoriasis. Although sleep disturbances are more prevalent, this may be secondary to depression rather than related to a direct effect of psoriasis.

AB - BACKGROUND: Psoriasis negatively impacts sleep, but the factors that cause this sleep disturbance are not well characterized. PURPOSE: To assess sleep quality in subjects with psoriasis. METHODS: 35 outpatients diagnosed with chronic plaque psoriasis affecting at least 10 percent BSA and 44 controls completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Patient Health Questionnaire, Itch Severity Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. For multiple testing, alpha was set at 0.008. RESULTS: Adjusting for age, BMI, and gender, patients with psoriasis had 4.3 times the odds to score in a higher insomnia category (OR 95% CI: 1.7, 11.2; p=0.01), a trend toward experiencing poor sleep (p=0.04), and no difference in odds to be sleepy (p=0.83). Patients with psoriasis had greater itch than those without psoriasis (mean ISS 8.5 vs. 2.0; p<0.0001). When adjusting for age, BMI, gender, and depression, those with psoriasis were not more likely to experience poor sleep quality (p=0.25), nor to score in a higher insomnia category (p=0.20) or be more sleepy (p=0.53). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with psoriasis suffer from sleep disturbances and pruritus more than those without psoriasis. Although sleep disturbances are more prevalent, this may be secondary to depression rather than related to a direct effect of psoriasis.

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