Steve Trevor, Equal? Wonder Woman in an Era of Second Wave Feminist Critique: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times.

Ruth McClelland-Nugent, Ruth E Nugent

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the late 1960s, DC comics made a bold move to change Wonder Woman's costume, take away her superpowers, and kill of her boyfriend, Steve Trevor. Fan reactions to her new story as a "swinging" martial artist were mixed; although initially the comic sold well, it came under increasing criticism from feminist readers., including Gloria Steinem, founder of Ms. magazine. In 1972, DC changed the character back and began incorporating Second Wave feminist themes into the book for most of the 1970s. Using feminist texts of the day, and letters from fans, this chapter analyzes the rise and decline of feminist rhetoric in the comic, finding that fan hostility towards feminism increased in the early 1980s, mirroring the Reagan-era backlash against feminism in political and popular culture. Fan opinions of Steve Trevor, Wonder Woman's boyfriend, provide a useful measure of pro- and anti-feminist attitudes.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Ages of Wonder Woman.
Subtitle of host publicationEssays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times.
EditorsDarowski Joseph
PublisherMcFarland and Company
ISBN (Print)9780786471225
StatePublished - Dec 31 2013

Fingerprint

Amazon
Waves
Feminism
1970s
Letters
Ronald Reagan
DC Comics
Costume
Criticism
Popular Culture
Rhetoric
Reader
Rise
Artist
Hostility
1980s
1960s
Backlash
Mirroring
Political Culture

Cite this

McClelland-Nugent, R., & Nugent, R. E. (2013). Steve Trevor, Equal? Wonder Woman in an Era of Second Wave Feminist Critique: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times. In D. Joseph (Ed.), The Ages of Wonder Woman.: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times. McFarland and Company.

Steve Trevor, Equal? Wonder Woman in an Era of Second Wave Feminist Critique : Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times. / McClelland-Nugent, Ruth; Nugent, Ruth E.

The Ages of Wonder Woman.: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times.. ed. / Darowski Joseph. McFarland and Company, 2013.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

McClelland-Nugent, R & Nugent, RE 2013, Steve Trevor, Equal? Wonder Woman in an Era of Second Wave Feminist Critique: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times. in D Joseph (ed.), The Ages of Wonder Woman.: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times.. McFarland and Company.
McClelland-Nugent R, Nugent RE. Steve Trevor, Equal? Wonder Woman in an Era of Second Wave Feminist Critique: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times. In Joseph D, editor, The Ages of Wonder Woman.: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times.. McFarland and Company. 2013
McClelland-Nugent, Ruth ; Nugent, Ruth E. / Steve Trevor, Equal? Wonder Woman in an Era of Second Wave Feminist Critique : Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times. The Ages of Wonder Woman.: Essays on the Amazon Princess in Changing Times.. editor / Darowski Joseph. McFarland and Company, 2013.
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