Superior mediastinal dissection in the treatment of hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid

Alberto A.J. Maillard, Stilianos E Kountakis, Charles M. Stiernberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid frequently metastasizes to regional lymph nodes. Delayed lymph node dissection may become necessary, adding little risk to patient survivability; however, metastatic disease to the superior mediastinum that cannot be promptly detected, represents a survival threat that deserves special attention. The purpose of this study is to review our experience in managing Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid and make recommendations for appropriate treatment. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of 371 thyroid neoplasms seen between 1987 and 1994 yielded six patients with Hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland. These include three cases treated with thyroidectomy and transcervical superior mediastinal dissection (SMD) as initial treatment and three cases treated with thyroidectomy alone. Results: Of the three patients treated with SMD as part of their initial treatment, one had occult micrometastases to the superior mediastinum. All three patients remain alive and disease free at least 3 years later, whereas all three patients treated with thyroidectomy alone developed superior mediastinal metastases and died of their disease. Conclusion: We propose that at the time of initial surgery, a transcervical SMD may prevent spread to the superior mediastinum and therefore, improve survivability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-50
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Dissection
Thyroidectomy
Mediastinum
Therapeutics
Neoplasm Micrometastasis
Lymph Node Excision
Thyroid Neoplasms
Hurthle cell Thyroid cancer
Thyroid Gland
Lymph Nodes
Neoplasm Metastasis
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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Superior mediastinal dissection in the treatment of hurthle cell carcinoma of the thyroid. / Maillard, Alberto A.J.; Kountakis, Stilianos E; Stiernberg, Charles M.

In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 47-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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