Targeting hyaluronic acid family for cancer chemoprevention and therapy

Vinata B Lokeshwar, Summan Mirza, Andre Jordan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyaluronic acid or hyaluronan (HA) is perhaps one of the most uncomplicated large polymers that regulates several normal physiological processes and, at the same time, contributes to the manifestation of a variety of chronic and acute diseases, including cancer. Members of the HA signaling pathway (HA synthases, HA receptors, and HYAL-1 hyaluronidase) have been experimentally shown to promote tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, and hence each of them is a potential target for cancer therapy. Furthermore, as these members are also overexpressed in a variety of carcinomas, targeting of the HA family is clinically relevant. A variety of targeted approaches have been developed to target various HA family members, including small-molecule inhibitors and antibody and vaccine therapies. These treatment approaches inhibit HA-mediated intracellular signaling that promotes tumor cell proliferation, motility, and invasion, as well as induction of endothelial cell functions. Being nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and versatile for modifications, HA has been used in nanoparticle preparations for the targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs and other anticancer compounds to tumor cells through interaction with cell-surface HA receptors. This review discusses basic and clinical translational aspects of targeting each HA family member and respective treatment approaches that have been described in the literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Cancer Research
PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
Pages35-65
Number of pages31
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Publication series

NameAdvances in Cancer Research
Volume123
ISSN (Print)0065-230X

Fingerprint

Chemoprevention
Hyaluronic Acid
Neoplasms
CD44 Antigens
Therapeutics
Physiological Phenomena
Active Immunotherapy
Hyaluronoglucosaminidase
Cell Surface Receptors
Acute Disease
Cell Communication
Nanoparticles
Cell Movement
Polymers
Chronic Disease
Endothelial Cells
Cell Proliferation
Neoplasm Metastasis
Carcinoma
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • CD44
  • HA synthase
  • HYAL-1
  • Hyaluronic acid
  • RHAMM
  • Targeted cancer therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Lokeshwar, V. B., Mirza, S., & Jordan, A. (2014). Targeting hyaluronic acid family for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. In Advances in Cancer Research (pp. 35-65). (Advances in Cancer Research; Vol. 123). Academic Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800092-2.00002-2

Targeting hyaluronic acid family for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. / Lokeshwar, Vinata B; Mirza, Summan; Jordan, Andre.

Advances in Cancer Research. Academic Press Inc., 2014. p. 35-65 (Advances in Cancer Research; Vol. 123).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Lokeshwar, VB, Mirza, S & Jordan, A 2014, Targeting hyaluronic acid family for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. in Advances in Cancer Research. Advances in Cancer Research, vol. 123, Academic Press Inc., pp. 35-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800092-2.00002-2
Lokeshwar VB, Mirza S, Jordan A. Targeting hyaluronic acid family for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. In Advances in Cancer Research. Academic Press Inc. 2014. p. 35-65. (Advances in Cancer Research). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800092-2.00002-2
Lokeshwar, Vinata B ; Mirza, Summan ; Jordan, Andre. / Targeting hyaluronic acid family for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Advances in Cancer Research. Academic Press Inc., 2014. pp. 35-65 (Advances in Cancer Research).
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