Telemedicine diagnosis of aids-related retinopathies by direct ophthalmoscopy

M. Camp, S. Brooks, F. Bassi, M. Deen, Cheryl L Newman, D. Bates, Maribeth H Johnson, D. Marcus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. Direct ophthalmoscopes with real time video-linked capabilities are present in each of the 59 sites within the Georgia Statewide Telemedicine System (GSTS). We performed a pilot study to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the GSTS direct ophthalmoscope in ne diagnosis of AIDS-related retinopathies. Methods Thirty three eyes of seventeen AIDS patients with CD4 counts <50 cells/ml were recruited. Subjects underwent dilated, direct ophthalmoscopic fundus examination by a non-ophthalmologist physician with telemedical transmission of real time images to an ophthalmologist. A gold standard, in-person comprehensive examination, including indirect ophthalmoscopy, was performed by a second ophthalmologist. Telemedical evaluation was compared to the in-person comprehensive examination. Results. Twenty one eyes did not demonstrate retinal disease by in-person examination. Of the 21 disease-free eyes,telemedical examination correctly evaluated 20 eyes as disease free (specificity = 95%). HIV retinopathy was present in 12 of 33 eyes as determined by in-person examination. Ten of the 12 eyes with HIV retinopathy were correctly diagnosed by telemedical evaluation(sensitivity = 83%). Conclusions. Direct ophthalmoscopic telemedical evaluation may possess the potential to assist the primary care physician in evaluating patients for AIDS-related retinopathies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume37
Issue number3
StatePublished - Feb 15 1996

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Ophthalmoscopy
Telemedicine
Ophthalmoscopes
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Eye Diseases
HIV
Retinal Diseases
Primary Care Physicians
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Physicians
Sensitivity and Specificity
Ophthalmologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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Telemedicine diagnosis of aids-related retinopathies by direct ophthalmoscopy. / Camp, M.; Brooks, S.; Bassi, F.; Deen, M.; Newman, Cheryl L; Bates, D.; Johnson, Maribeth H; Marcus, D.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 37, No. 3, 15.02.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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