The addition of lysostaphin dramatically improves survival, protects porcine biomesh from infection, and improves graft tensile shear strength

Igor Belyansky, Victor B. Tsirline, Terri Regina Martin, David A. Klima, Jessica Heath, Amy E. Lincourt, Rohan Satishkumar, Alexey Vertegel, B. Todd Heniford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Lysostaphin (LS), a naturally occurring Staphylococcal endopeptidase, has the ability to penetrate biofilm, and has been identified as a potential antimicrobial to prevent mesh infection. The goals of this study were to determine if LS adhered to porcine mesh (PM) can impact host survival, reduce the risk of long-term PM infection, and to analyze lysostaphin bound PM (LS-PM) mesh-fascial interface in an infected field. Methods: Abdominal onlay PMs measuring 3 × 3 cm were implanted in select groups of rats (n = 75). Group assignments were based on bacterial inoculum and presence of LS on mesh. Explantation occurred at 60 d. Bacterial growth and mesh-fascial interface tensile strength were analyzed. Standard statistical analysis was performed. Results: Only one out of 30 rats with bacterial inoculum not treated with LS survived. All 30 LS treated rats survived and had normal appearing mesh, including 20 rats with a bacterial inoculum (10 6 and 10 8 CFU). Mean tensile strength for controls and LS and no inoculum samples was 3.47 ± 0.86N versus 5.0 ± 1.0N (P = 0.008). LS groups inoculated with 10 6 and 10 8 CFU exhibited mean tensile strengths of 4.9 ± 1.5 N and 6.7 ± 1.6 N, respectively (P = 0.019 and P < 0.001 compared with controls). Conclusion: Rats inoculated with S. aureus and not treated with LS had a mortality of 97%. By comparison, LS treated animals completely cleared S. aureus when challenged with bacterial concentrations of 1 × 10 6 and 1 × 10 8 with maintenance of mesh integrity at 60 d. These findings strongly suggest the clinical use of LS-treated porcine mesh in contaminated fields may translate into more durable hernia repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-415
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume171
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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Lysostaphin
Shear Strength
Tensile Strength
Swine
Transplants
Infection
Endopeptidases
Inlays
Herniorrhaphy
Biofilms

Keywords

  • antimicrobials
  • biologics
  • hernia
  • infection
  • lysostaphin
  • porcine mesh

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

The addition of lysostaphin dramatically improves survival, protects porcine biomesh from infection, and improves graft tensile shear strength. / Belyansky, Igor; Tsirline, Victor B.; Martin, Terri Regina; Klima, David A.; Heath, Jessica; Lincourt, Amy E.; Satishkumar, Rohan; Vertegel, Alexey; Heniford, B. Todd.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 171, No. 2, 01.12.2011, p. 409-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Belyansky, I, Tsirline, VB, Martin, TR, Klima, DA, Heath, J, Lincourt, AE, Satishkumar, R, Vertegel, A & Heniford, BT 2011, 'The addition of lysostaphin dramatically improves survival, protects porcine biomesh from infection, and improves graft tensile shear strength', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 171, no. 2, pp. 409-415. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2011.04.014
Belyansky, Igor ; Tsirline, Victor B. ; Martin, Terri Regina ; Klima, David A. ; Heath, Jessica ; Lincourt, Amy E. ; Satishkumar, Rohan ; Vertegel, Alexey ; Heniford, B. Todd. / The addition of lysostaphin dramatically improves survival, protects porcine biomesh from infection, and improves graft tensile shear strength. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2011 ; Vol. 171, No. 2. pp. 409-415.
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abstract = "Background: Lysostaphin (LS), a naturally occurring Staphylococcal endopeptidase, has the ability to penetrate biofilm, and has been identified as a potential antimicrobial to prevent mesh infection. The goals of this study were to determine if LS adhered to porcine mesh (PM) can impact host survival, reduce the risk of long-term PM infection, and to analyze lysostaphin bound PM (LS-PM) mesh-fascial interface in an infected field. Methods: Abdominal onlay PMs measuring 3 × 3 cm were implanted in select groups of rats (n = 75). Group assignments were based on bacterial inoculum and presence of LS on mesh. Explantation occurred at 60 d. Bacterial growth and mesh-fascial interface tensile strength were analyzed. Standard statistical analysis was performed. Results: Only one out of 30 rats with bacterial inoculum not treated with LS survived. All 30 LS treated rats survived and had normal appearing mesh, including 20 rats with a bacterial inoculum (10 6 and 10 8 CFU). Mean tensile strength for controls and LS and no inoculum samples was 3.47 ± 0.86N versus 5.0 ± 1.0N (P = 0.008). LS groups inoculated with 10 6 and 10 8 CFU exhibited mean tensile strengths of 4.9 ± 1.5 N and 6.7 ± 1.6 N, respectively (P = 0.019 and P < 0.001 compared with controls). Conclusion: Rats inoculated with S. aureus and not treated with LS had a mortality of 97{\%}. By comparison, LS treated animals completely cleared S. aureus when challenged with bacterial concentrations of 1 × 10 6 and 1 × 10 8 with maintenance of mesh integrity at 60 d. These findings strongly suggest the clinical use of LS-treated porcine mesh in contaminated fields may translate into more durable hernia repair.",
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T1 - The addition of lysostaphin dramatically improves survival, protects porcine biomesh from infection, and improves graft tensile shear strength

AU - Belyansky, Igor

AU - Tsirline, Victor B.

AU - Martin, Terri Regina

AU - Klima, David A.

AU - Heath, Jessica

AU - Lincourt, Amy E.

AU - Satishkumar, Rohan

AU - Vertegel, Alexey

AU - Heniford, B. Todd

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N2 - Background: Lysostaphin (LS), a naturally occurring Staphylococcal endopeptidase, has the ability to penetrate biofilm, and has been identified as a potential antimicrobial to prevent mesh infection. The goals of this study were to determine if LS adhered to porcine mesh (PM) can impact host survival, reduce the risk of long-term PM infection, and to analyze lysostaphin bound PM (LS-PM) mesh-fascial interface in an infected field. Methods: Abdominal onlay PMs measuring 3 × 3 cm were implanted in select groups of rats (n = 75). Group assignments were based on bacterial inoculum and presence of LS on mesh. Explantation occurred at 60 d. Bacterial growth and mesh-fascial interface tensile strength were analyzed. Standard statistical analysis was performed. Results: Only one out of 30 rats with bacterial inoculum not treated with LS survived. All 30 LS treated rats survived and had normal appearing mesh, including 20 rats with a bacterial inoculum (10 6 and 10 8 CFU). Mean tensile strength for controls and LS and no inoculum samples was 3.47 ± 0.86N versus 5.0 ± 1.0N (P = 0.008). LS groups inoculated with 10 6 and 10 8 CFU exhibited mean tensile strengths of 4.9 ± 1.5 N and 6.7 ± 1.6 N, respectively (P = 0.019 and P < 0.001 compared with controls). Conclusion: Rats inoculated with S. aureus and not treated with LS had a mortality of 97%. By comparison, LS treated animals completely cleared S. aureus when challenged with bacterial concentrations of 1 × 10 6 and 1 × 10 8 with maintenance of mesh integrity at 60 d. These findings strongly suggest the clinical use of LS-treated porcine mesh in contaminated fields may translate into more durable hernia repair.

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