The behavioral effects of magnesium therapy on recovery of function following bilateral anterior medial cortex lesions in the rat

Michael R. Hoane, Allison A. Knotts, Stacy L. Akstulewicz, Marie Aquilano, Larry W. Means

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Magnesium (Mg++) therapy has been shown to be neuroprotective and to facilitate recovery of motor and sensorimotor function in a variety of animal models of traumatic brain injury. However, few studies have investigated the efficacy of Mg++ therapy on cognitive impairments following injury. The present study evaluated the ability of magnesium chloride (MgCl2) to facilitate recovery of function following bilateral anterior medial cortex lesions (bAMC). Rats received electrolytic bAMC lesions or sham surgery and were then treated with 1mmol/kg, i.p. MgCl2, 2mmol/kg, i.p. MgCl2, or 1.0ml/kg, i.p. 0.9% saline. Drug treatment was administered 15min following injury with subsequent injections administered at 24 and 72h. Rats were tested on a battery of behavioral tests that measured both cognitive (reference and working memory in the Morris Water Maze (MWM) and spatial delayed matching-to-sample (DMTS)) and sensorimotor performance (bilateral tactile adhesive removal). The results indicated that bAMC lesions produced significant cognitive impairments in reference memory and working memory in the MWM, DMTS and sensorimotor impairments compared to shams. Mg++ therapy exhibited a dose-dependent effect in facilitating recovery of function. Administration of 2mmol of MgCl2 significantly improved performance on the bilateral adhesive tactile removal test, DMTS and working memory tests. The 1mmol dose of MgCl2 reduced the initial deficit on the tactile adhesive removal test and reduced the working memory impairment on the second day of testing. These results suggest Mg++ therapy improves cognitive performance following injury in a dose-dependent manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-114
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume60
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brain injury
  • Cognitive deficits
  • DMTS
  • Reference memory
  • Sensorimotor behavior
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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