The biology of adhesion formation in the peritoneal cavity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intraperitoneal adhesions are frequently encountered and present significant challenges to the practicing surgeon, including increased operating time, bowel obstruction, pelvic pain, and infertility. Until recently, however, our knowledge of the biology of adhesion formation within the peritoneal cavity has been limited, which in turn limits prevention and treatment strategies for surgical patients. Extensive research has now led to an increased understanding of adhesion formation, with hypoxia playing a central role. Hypoxia stimulates a cascade that leads to oxidative stress, anaerobic metabolism, formation of free radicals, and ultimately the adhesion phenotype. By understanding the precipitants to adhesion development, we may begin to develop prevention and treatment therapies that will provide clinically significant improvement over the currently available approaches to limit postoperative adhesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-343
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Pediatric Surgery
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2015

Fingerprint

Peritoneal Cavity
Anaerobiosis
Pelvic Pain
Infertility
Free Radicals
Oxidative Stress
Therapeutics
Phenotype
Research
Hypoxia

Keywords

  • Adhesion phenotype
  • Adhesions
  • Hypoxia
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The biology of adhesion formation in the peritoneal cavity. / Braun, Kelli Melissa; Diamond, Michael Peter.

In: Seminars in Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 23, No. 6, 05.2015, p. 336-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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