The coming of age of telecommunications in psychological research and practice

Leigh W. Jerome, Patrick H. Deleon, Larry C. James, Raymond Folen, Jay Edward Earles, Jeffrey J. Gedney

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

116 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rapid and far-reaching technological advances are revolutionizing the ways in which people relate, communicate, and live their daily lives. Technologies that were hardly used a few years ago, such as the Internet, e-mail, and video teleconferencing, are becoming familiar methods for modern communication. Telecommunications will continue to evolve quickly, spawning telehealth applications for research and the provision of clinical care in communities, university settings, clinics, and medical facilities. The impact on psychology will be significant. This article examines the application of developing technologies as they relate to psychology and discusses implications for professional research and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-421
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Psychologist
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Jerome, L. W., Deleon, P. H., James, L. C., Folen, R., Earles, J. E., & Gedney, J. J. (2000). The coming of age of telecommunications in psychological research and practice. American Psychologist, 55(4), 407-421. https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.55.4.407