The complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration

Martin J. Rutkowski, Michael E. Sughrue, Ari J. Kane, Brian J. Ahn, Shanna Fang, Andrew T. Parsa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Recent evidence has demonstrated that the complement cascade is involved in a variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic processes in addition to its role as an immune effector. Research in a variety of organ systems has shown that complement proteins are direct participants in maintenance of cellular turnover, healing, proliferation and regeneration. As a physiologic housekeeper, complement proteins maintain tissue integrity in the absence of inflammation by disposing of cellular debris and waste, a process critical to the prevention of autoimmune disease. Developmentally, complement proteins influence pathways including hematopoietic stem cell engraftment, bone growth, and angiogenesis. They also provide a potent stimulus for cellular proliferation including regeneration of the limb and eye in animal models, and liver proliferation following injury. Here, we describe the complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)897-905
Number of pages9
JournalInflammation Research
Volume59
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Regeneration
Complement System Proteins
Growth
Bone Development
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Autoimmune Diseases
Extremities
Animal Models
Maintenance
Cell Proliferation
Inflammation
Liver
Wounds and Injuries
Research

Keywords

  • Complement
  • Growth
  • Healing
  • Proliferation
  • Regeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Rutkowski, M. J., Sughrue, M. E., Kane, A. J., Ahn, B. J., Fang, S., & Parsa, A. T. (2010). The complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration. Inflammation Research, 59(11), 897-905. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00011-010-0220-6

The complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration. / Rutkowski, Martin J.; Sughrue, Michael E.; Kane, Ari J.; Ahn, Brian J.; Fang, Shanna; Parsa, Andrew T.

In: Inflammation Research, Vol. 59, No. 11, 01.11.2010, p. 897-905.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Rutkowski, MJ, Sughrue, ME, Kane, AJ, Ahn, BJ, Fang, S & Parsa, AT 2010, 'The complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration', Inflammation Research, vol. 59, no. 11, pp. 897-905. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00011-010-0220-6
Rutkowski MJ, Sughrue ME, Kane AJ, Ahn BJ, Fang S, Parsa AT. The complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration. Inflammation Research. 2010 Nov 1;59(11):897-905. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00011-010-0220-6
Rutkowski, Martin J. ; Sughrue, Michael E. ; Kane, Ari J. ; Ahn, Brian J. ; Fang, Shanna ; Parsa, Andrew T. / The complement cascade as a mediator of tissue growth and regeneration. In: Inflammation Research. 2010 ; Vol. 59, No. 11. pp. 897-905.
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