The current state of esophagogastroduodenoscopy training in family practice residency programs

Jeff T Wilkins, Hal Hardy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is a useful diagnostic procedure to evaluate patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints. Although family physicians have demonstrated that they can competently perform EGD, only a minority of family physicians perform EGD. This study determined the current state of EGD training in US family practice residency programs and how often graduating residents seek EGD privileges. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study surveying program directors from all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved family practice residency programs regarding EGD training in their program. Results: Of the 471 surveys mailed, 441 (94%) were returned. A total of 143 (32%) program directors reported that their program offered EGD training, but only 58 (13%) actually trained at least one resident. Residents performed a mean of 20 ± 2.4 EGDs per resident, and residents trained by family physicians performed more EGDs than residents trained by other specialties. In July 2000, .04% of graduating family practice residents sought credentials for EGD, and their training occurred in 32 (7%) residency programs. Conclusions: Only a minority of family practice residents seek credentialing after residency to perform EGD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-272
Number of pages4
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume35
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

Fingerprint

Digestive System Endoscopy
Family Practice
Internship and Residency
Family Physicians
Credentialing
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The current state of esophagogastroduodenoscopy training in family practice residency programs. / Wilkins, Jeff T; Hardy, Hal.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 269-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{344c9ed502b44e6d8811a4dcd0308888,
title = "The current state of esophagogastroduodenoscopy training in family practice residency programs",
abstract = "Background and Objectives: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is a useful diagnostic procedure to evaluate patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints. Although family physicians have demonstrated that they can competently perform EGD, only a minority of family physicians perform EGD. This study determined the current state of EGD training in US family practice residency programs and how often graduating residents seek EGD privileges. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study surveying program directors from all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved family practice residency programs regarding EGD training in their program. Results: Of the 471 surveys mailed, 441 (94{\%}) were returned. A total of 143 (32{\%}) program directors reported that their program offered EGD training, but only 58 (13{\%}) actually trained at least one resident. Residents performed a mean of 20 ± 2.4 EGDs per resident, and residents trained by family physicians performed more EGDs than residents trained by other specialties. In July 2000, .04{\%} of graduating family practice residents sought credentials for EGD, and their training occurred in 32 (7{\%}) residency programs. Conclusions: Only a minority of family practice residents seek credentialing after residency to perform EGD.",
author = "Wilkins, {Jeff T} and Hal Hardy",
year = "2003",
month = "4",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "269--272",
journal = "Family Medicine",
issn = "0742-3225",
publisher = "Society of Teachers of Family Medicine",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The current state of esophagogastroduodenoscopy training in family practice residency programs

AU - Wilkins, Jeff T

AU - Hardy, Hal

PY - 2003/4/1

Y1 - 2003/4/1

N2 - Background and Objectives: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is a useful diagnostic procedure to evaluate patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints. Although family physicians have demonstrated that they can competently perform EGD, only a minority of family physicians perform EGD. This study determined the current state of EGD training in US family practice residency programs and how often graduating residents seek EGD privileges. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study surveying program directors from all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved family practice residency programs regarding EGD training in their program. Results: Of the 471 surveys mailed, 441 (94%) were returned. A total of 143 (32%) program directors reported that their program offered EGD training, but only 58 (13%) actually trained at least one resident. Residents performed a mean of 20 ± 2.4 EGDs per resident, and residents trained by family physicians performed more EGDs than residents trained by other specialties. In July 2000, .04% of graduating family practice residents sought credentials for EGD, and their training occurred in 32 (7%) residency programs. Conclusions: Only a minority of family practice residents seek credentialing after residency to perform EGD.

AB - Background and Objectives: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is a useful diagnostic procedure to evaluate patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints. Although family physicians have demonstrated that they can competently perform EGD, only a minority of family physicians perform EGD. This study determined the current state of EGD training in US family practice residency programs and how often graduating residents seek EGD privileges. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study surveying program directors from all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved family practice residency programs regarding EGD training in their program. Results: Of the 471 surveys mailed, 441 (94%) were returned. A total of 143 (32%) program directors reported that their program offered EGD training, but only 58 (13%) actually trained at least one resident. Residents performed a mean of 20 ± 2.4 EGDs per resident, and residents trained by family physicians performed more EGDs than residents trained by other specialties. In July 2000, .04% of graduating family practice residents sought credentials for EGD, and their training occurred in 32 (7%) residency programs. Conclusions: Only a minority of family practice residents seek credentialing after residency to perform EGD.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037395619&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037395619&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12729312

AN - SCOPUS:0037395619

VL - 35

SP - 269

EP - 272

JO - Family Medicine

JF - Family Medicine

SN - 0742-3225

IS - 4

ER -