The dig task

a simple scent discrimination reveals deficits following frontal brain damage.

Kris M. Martens, Cole Vonder Haar, Blake A. Hutsell, Michael R. Hoane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive impairment is the most frequent cause of disability in humans following brain damage, yet the behavioral tasks used to assess cognition in rodent models of brain injury is lacking. Borrowing from the operant literature our laboratory utilized a basic scent discrimination paradigm in order to assess deficits in frontally-injured rats. Previously we have briefly described the Dig task and demonstrated that rats with frontal brain damage show severe deficits across multiple tests within the task. Here we present a more detailed protocol for this task. Rats are placed into a chamber and allowed to discriminate between two scented sands, one of which contains a reinforcer. The trial ends after the rat either correctly discriminates (defined as digging in the correct scented sand), incorrectly discriminates, or 30 sec elapses. Rats that correctly discriminate are allowed to recover and consume the reinforcer. Rats that discriminate incorrectly are immediately removed from the chamber. This can continue through a variety of reversals and novel scents. The primary analysis is the accuracy for each scent pairing (cumulative proportion correct for each scent). The general findings from the Dig task suggest that it is a simple experimental preparation that can assess deficits in rats with bilateral frontal cortical damage compared to rats with unilateral parietal damage. The Dig task can also be easily incorporated into an existing cognitive test battery. The use of more tasks such as this one can lead to more accurate testing of frontal function following injury, which may lead to therapeutic options for treatment. All animal use was conducted in accordance with protocols approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUnknown Journal
Issue number71
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Rats
Brain
Animals
Sand
Animal Care Committees
Discrimination (Psychology)
Brain Injuries
Cognition
Rodentia
Wounds and Injuries
Testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

The dig task : a simple scent discrimination reveals deficits following frontal brain damage. / Martens, Kris M.; Vonder Haar, Cole; Hutsell, Blake A.; Hoane, Michael R.

In: Unknown Journal, No. 71, 01.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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