The droopy shoulder syndrome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We found that patients with thoracic outlet syndrome have: (1) low-set, “droopy” shoulders and long swan neck; (2) pain in the neck, shoulder, chest, arms, or hands; (3) aggravation of symptoms by downward traction and relief by propping up the arms; (4) occurrence in women; (5) absence of abnormal vascular, neurologic, and electrical findings; (6) a Tinel’s sign over the brachial plexus; and (7) T-2 vertebra visible above the shoulders on lateral cervical spine films. In our experience, droopy shoulder syndrome has accounted for most cases of thoracic outlet syndrome but is largely unrecognized by physicians. Recognition of this syndrome should lead to a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and prevent unnecessary surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-215
Number of pages4
JournalNeurology
Volume34
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Fingerprint

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
Spine
Arm
Unnecessary Procedures
Brachial Plexus
Neck Pain
Traction
Motion Pictures
Neurologic Manifestations
Blood Vessels
Neck
Thorax
Hand
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The droopy shoulder syndrome. / Swift, Thomas Robert; Nichols, Fenwick T.

In: Neurology, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.01.1984, p. 212-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swift, TR & Nichols, FT 1984, 'The droopy shoulder syndrome', Neurology, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 212-215.
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