The effect of initial irrigation with two different sodium hypochlorite concentrations on the erosion of instrumented radicular dentin

Kai Zhang, Franklin R. Tay, Young Kyung Kim, Jan K. Mitchell, Jong Ryul Kim, Marcela Carrilho, David H. Pashley, Jun qi Ling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study evaluated the effects of different NaOCl concentrations and contact times on removal of the organic phase from mineralized dentin with and without the adjunctive use of EDTA, and the effect of NaOCl concentrations on canal wall erosion after the use of EDTA as the final active irrigant. Methods: Dentin powders were immersed in 5.25% or 1.3% NaOCl for different contact periods and then rinsed with 17% EDTA for 2 min. Before and after the use of 17% EDTA as the final rinse, the NaOCl-treated dentin powders were examined using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy to analyze the relative loss of organic and inorganic components. Scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the erosion of instrumented canal walls irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl/EDTA or 1.3% NaOCl/EDTA. Results: Compared with 1.3% NaOCl, less intact collagen remained within the subsurface of the mineralized dentin powder after the use of 5.25% NaOCl, irrespective of subsequent rinsing with 17% EDTA. Canal wall erosion was apparent only under SEM when root canals were irrigated 5.25% NaOCl followed by 17% EDTA. Under TEM examination, subsurface erosion extended 10-15 μm beneath the sealer-bonded dentin surface after the use of 5.25% NaOCl for 20 min. Conclusion: The superficial destructive effect of NaOCl on mineralized dentin is irreversible and is present irrespective of whether EDTA is subsequently employed as the final active irrigant. The EDTA removes the collagen-depleted apatite phase to expose the underlying cause of destruction that is morphologically perceived as canal wall erosion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)514-523
Number of pages10
JournalDental Materials
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

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Sodium Hypochlorite
Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid
Dentin
Irrigation
Edetic Acid
Erosion
Sodium
Canals
Powders
Collagen
Transmission electron microscopy
Apatites
Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy
Scanning electron microscopy
Dental Pulp Cavity
Apatite
Transmission Electron Microscopy
X ray powder diffraction
Infrared spectroscopy
Spectrum Analysis

Keywords

  • Canal wall erosion
  • Collagen matrix
  • EDTA
  • FT-IR
  • NaOCl
  • Radicular dentin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

The effect of initial irrigation with two different sodium hypochlorite concentrations on the erosion of instrumented radicular dentin. / Zhang, Kai; Tay, Franklin R.; Kim, Young Kyung; Mitchell, Jan K.; Kim, Jong Ryul; Carrilho, Marcela; Pashley, David H.; Ling, Jun qi.

In: Dental Materials, Vol. 26, No. 6, 01.06.2010, p. 514-523.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Kai ; Tay, Franklin R. ; Kim, Young Kyung ; Mitchell, Jan K. ; Kim, Jong Ryul ; Carrilho, Marcela ; Pashley, David H. ; Ling, Jun qi. / The effect of initial irrigation with two different sodium hypochlorite concentrations on the erosion of instrumented radicular dentin. In: Dental Materials. 2010 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 514-523.
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abstract = "Objective: This study evaluated the effects of different NaOCl concentrations and contact times on removal of the organic phase from mineralized dentin with and without the adjunctive use of EDTA, and the effect of NaOCl concentrations on canal wall erosion after the use of EDTA as the final active irrigant. Methods: Dentin powders were immersed in 5.25{\%} or 1.3{\%} NaOCl for different contact periods and then rinsed with 17{\%} EDTA for 2 min. Before and after the use of 17{\%} EDTA as the final rinse, the NaOCl-treated dentin powders were examined using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy to analyze the relative loss of organic and inorganic components. Scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the erosion of instrumented canal walls irrigated with 5.25{\%} NaOCl/EDTA or 1.3{\%} NaOCl/EDTA. Results: Compared with 1.3{\%} NaOCl, less intact collagen remained within the subsurface of the mineralized dentin powder after the use of 5.25{\%} NaOCl, irrespective of subsequent rinsing with 17{\%} EDTA. Canal wall erosion was apparent only under SEM when root canals were irrigated 5.25{\%} NaOCl followed by 17{\%} EDTA. Under TEM examination, subsurface erosion extended 10-15 μm beneath the sealer-bonded dentin surface after the use of 5.25{\%} NaOCl for 20 min. Conclusion: The superficial destructive effect of NaOCl on mineralized dentin is irreversible and is present irrespective of whether EDTA is subsequently employed as the final active irrigant. The EDTA removes the collagen-depleted apatite phase to expose the underlying cause of destruction that is morphologically perceived as canal wall erosion.",
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T1 - The effect of initial irrigation with two different sodium hypochlorite concentrations on the erosion of instrumented radicular dentin

AU - Zhang, Kai

AU - Tay, Franklin R.

AU - Kim, Young Kyung

AU - Mitchell, Jan K.

AU - Kim, Jong Ryul

AU - Carrilho, Marcela

AU - Pashley, David H.

AU - Ling, Jun qi

PY - 2010/6/1

Y1 - 2010/6/1

N2 - Objective: This study evaluated the effects of different NaOCl concentrations and contact times on removal of the organic phase from mineralized dentin with and without the adjunctive use of EDTA, and the effect of NaOCl concentrations on canal wall erosion after the use of EDTA as the final active irrigant. Methods: Dentin powders were immersed in 5.25% or 1.3% NaOCl for different contact periods and then rinsed with 17% EDTA for 2 min. Before and after the use of 17% EDTA as the final rinse, the NaOCl-treated dentin powders were examined using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy to analyze the relative loss of organic and inorganic components. Scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the erosion of instrumented canal walls irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl/EDTA or 1.3% NaOCl/EDTA. Results: Compared with 1.3% NaOCl, less intact collagen remained within the subsurface of the mineralized dentin powder after the use of 5.25% NaOCl, irrespective of subsequent rinsing with 17% EDTA. Canal wall erosion was apparent only under SEM when root canals were irrigated 5.25% NaOCl followed by 17% EDTA. Under TEM examination, subsurface erosion extended 10-15 μm beneath the sealer-bonded dentin surface after the use of 5.25% NaOCl for 20 min. Conclusion: The superficial destructive effect of NaOCl on mineralized dentin is irreversible and is present irrespective of whether EDTA is subsequently employed as the final active irrigant. The EDTA removes the collagen-depleted apatite phase to expose the underlying cause of destruction that is morphologically perceived as canal wall erosion.

AB - Objective: This study evaluated the effects of different NaOCl concentrations and contact times on removal of the organic phase from mineralized dentin with and without the adjunctive use of EDTA, and the effect of NaOCl concentrations on canal wall erosion after the use of EDTA as the final active irrigant. Methods: Dentin powders were immersed in 5.25% or 1.3% NaOCl for different contact periods and then rinsed with 17% EDTA for 2 min. Before and after the use of 17% EDTA as the final rinse, the NaOCl-treated dentin powders were examined using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy to analyze the relative loss of organic and inorganic components. Scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the erosion of instrumented canal walls irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl/EDTA or 1.3% NaOCl/EDTA. Results: Compared with 1.3% NaOCl, less intact collagen remained within the subsurface of the mineralized dentin powder after the use of 5.25% NaOCl, irrespective of subsequent rinsing with 17% EDTA. Canal wall erosion was apparent only under SEM when root canals were irrigated 5.25% NaOCl followed by 17% EDTA. Under TEM examination, subsurface erosion extended 10-15 μm beneath the sealer-bonded dentin surface after the use of 5.25% NaOCl for 20 min. Conclusion: The superficial destructive effect of NaOCl on mineralized dentin is irreversible and is present irrespective of whether EDTA is subsequently employed as the final active irrigant. The EDTA removes the collagen-depleted apatite phase to expose the underlying cause of destruction that is morphologically perceived as canal wall erosion.

KW - Canal wall erosion

KW - Collagen matrix

KW - EDTA

KW - FT-IR

KW - NaOCl

KW - Radicular dentin

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