The human sexuality education of physicians in north american medical schools

D. S. Solursh, J. L. Ernst, R. W. Lewis, L. Michael Prisant, T. M. Mills, L. P. Solursh, R. G. Jarvis, W. H. Salazar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Individuals seeking treatment for sexual problems frequently would like to turn to a source they consider knowledgeable and worthy of respect, their doctor. The objective was to assess how well the 125 schools of medicine in the United States and the 16 in Canada prepare physicians to diagnose and treat sexual problems. A prospective cohort study was carried out. The main outcome results were description of the medical educational experiences, teaching time, specific subject areas, clinical programs, clerkships, continuing education programs in the domain of human sexuality in North American medical schools. The results were as follows. There were 101 survey responses (71.6%) of a potential of 141 medical schools (74% of United States and 50% of Canadian medical schools). A total of 84 respondents (83.2%) for sexuality education used a lecture format. A single discipline was responsible for this teaching in 32 (31.7%) schools, but a multidisciplinary team was responsible in 64 (63.4%) schools (five schools failed to respond to the question). The majority (54.1%) of the schools provided 3–10 h of education. Causes of sexual dysfunction (94.1%), its treatment (85.2%) altered sexual identification (79.2%) and issues of sexuality in illness or disability (69.3%) were included in the curriculum of 96 respondents. Only 43 (42.6%) schools offered clinical programs, which included a focus on treating patients with sexual problems and dysfunctions, and 56 (55.5%) provided the students in their clerkships with supervision in dealing with sexual issues. In conclusion, expansion of human sexuality education in medical schools may be necessary to meet the public demand of an informed health provider.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S41-S45
JournalInternational journal of impotence research
Volume15
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2003

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Sexuality
Medical Schools
Physicians
Education
Teaching
Clinical Clerkship
Continuing Education
Curriculum
Canada
Cohort Studies
Medicine
Prospective Studies
Students
Health
Therapeutics
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Medical school curriculum
  • Medical students
  • Sexual education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

The human sexuality education of physicians in north american medical schools. / Solursh, D. S.; Ernst, J. L.; Lewis, R. W.; Prisant, L. Michael; Mills, T. M.; Solursh, L. P.; Jarvis, R. G.; Salazar, W. H.

In: International journal of impotence research, Vol. 15, 10.2003, p. S41-S45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solursh, DS, Ernst, JL, Lewis, RW, Prisant, LM, Mills, TM, Solursh, LP, Jarvis, RG & Salazar, WH 2003, 'The human sexuality education of physicians in north american medical schools', International journal of impotence research, vol. 15, pp. S41-S45. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijir.3901071
Solursh, D. S. ; Ernst, J. L. ; Lewis, R. W. ; Prisant, L. Michael ; Mills, T. M. ; Solursh, L. P. ; Jarvis, R. G. ; Salazar, W. H. / The human sexuality education of physicians in north american medical schools. In: International journal of impotence research. 2003 ; Vol. 15. pp. S41-S45.
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