The impact of a laparoscopic colorectal surgeon on the laparoscopic colectomy experience of a single academic center

M. T. Austin, I. D. Feurer, M. D. Holzman, W. O. Richards, C. W. Pinson, Alan Joseph Herline

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a laparoscopic colorectal surgeon (LCRS) on the laparoscopic colectomy experience of a single academic center. Background: We performed a retrospective review of case complexity, patient characteristics, operative and preparation time, and trends over time for the LCRS compared to two veteran laparoscopic surgeons (VLS). Results: The LCRS performed 48 of the procedures (83%) and the VLS 10 (17%) for a total of 58 laparoscopic colon cases. The LCRS handled a greater number of complex cases (p = 0.07). For less complex cases, overall operative time differed for the two groups (LCRS = 220 ± 11 vs VLS = 152 ± 15 min, p = 0.004). Overall hospital stay was 4.8 ± 0.6 days (range, 2-33). Minor complications occurred in 12 cases (21%); major complications in occurred in seven cases (12%). Among procedures performed by the LCRS, comparison of the first 24 cases to the second 24 demonstrated that operative and preparation time decreased in the second cohort (all p < 0.05). Conclusion: The addition of an LCRS had a significant impact on this center's experience with laparoscopic colectomies in terms of both volume and case complexity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-315
Number of pages5
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

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Colectomy
Veterans
Operative Time
Surgeons
Length of Stay
Colon

Keywords

  • Case complexity
  • Laparoscopic colectomy
  • Learning curve
  • Operative time
  • Surgical training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

The impact of a laparoscopic colorectal surgeon on the laparoscopic colectomy experience of a single academic center. / Austin, M. T.; Feurer, I. D.; Holzman, M. D.; Richards, W. O.; Pinson, C. W.; Herline, Alan Joseph.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.03.2005, p. 311-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Austin, M. T. ; Feurer, I. D. ; Holzman, M. D. ; Richards, W. O. ; Pinson, C. W. ; Herline, Alan Joseph. / The impact of a laparoscopic colorectal surgeon on the laparoscopic colectomy experience of a single academic center. In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 311-315.
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