The impact of central lung distance, maximal heart distance, and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of the lung and heart for intact breast radiation.

Feng Ming Kong, Eric E. Klein, Jeffrey D. Bradley, David B. Mansur, Marie E. Taylor, Carlos A. Perez, Robert J. Myerson, William B. Harms

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of radiographic parameter and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of lung and heart for intact breast radiation. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Forty patients with both two-dimensional (2D) and computed tomographic (CT) simulations were enrolled in the study. Central lung distance (CLD), maximal heart distance (MHD), and maximal heart length (MHL) were measured under virtual simulation. Four plans were compared for each patient. Plan A used a traditional 2D tangential setup. Plan B used clinical target volume (CTV) based three-dimensional (3D) planning. Both plans C and D used a combination of a medial breast field with shallow tangents. Plan D is a further modification of plan C. RESULTS: Under the traditional tangential setup, the mean ipsilateral lung dose and volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated linearly with CLD (R = 0.85 approximately 0.91). The mean ipsilateral lung dose (Gy) approximated 4 times the CLD value (cm), whereas the percentage volume (%) of ipsilateral lung at 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 10 times the CLD (cm). The mean heart dose and percentage volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated with MHD (R = 0.76 approximately 0.80) and MHL (R = 0.65 approximately 0.75). The mean heart dose (Gy) approximated 3 times the MHD value (cm), and the percentage volume (%) of the heart at 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 6 times MHD (cm). Radiation technique impacted lung and heart dose. The 3D tangential plan (plan B) failed to reduce the volumetric dose of lung and heart from that of the 2D plan (plan A). The medial breast techniques (plans C and D) significantly decreased the volume of lung and heart receiving high doses (30 and 40 Gy). Plan D further decreased the 20 Gy volumes. By use of the medial breast technique, the lung and heart dose were not impacted by original CLD and MHD/MHL. Therefore, the improvement from the tangential technique was more remarkable for patients with CLD >or= 3.0 cm (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The CLD and MHD impact the volumetric dose of lung and heart. The application of 3D planning for tangential breast irradiation does not decrease heart and lung dose. Adding a medial breast port significantly decreases percentage volume (PV) of lung and heart receiving high doses, especially when the CLD is excessive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)963-971
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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breast
lungs
Breast
Radiation
dosage
Lung
radiation
Cardiac Volume
Levonorgestrel
planning
tangents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

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The impact of central lung distance, maximal heart distance, and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of the lung and heart for intact breast radiation. / Kong, Feng Ming; Klein, Eric E.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Mansur, David B.; Taylor, Marie E.; Perez, Carlos A.; Myerson, Robert J.; Harms, William B.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, Vol. 54, No. 3, 01.01.2002, p. 963-971.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kong, Feng Ming ; Klein, Eric E. ; Bradley, Jeffrey D. ; Mansur, David B. ; Taylor, Marie E. ; Perez, Carlos A. ; Myerson, Robert J. ; Harms, William B. / The impact of central lung distance, maximal heart distance, and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of the lung and heart for intact breast radiation. In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics. 2002 ; Vol. 54, No. 3. pp. 963-971.
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title = "The impact of central lung distance, maximal heart distance, and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of the lung and heart for intact breast radiation.",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of radiographic parameter and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of lung and heart for intact breast radiation. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Forty patients with both two-dimensional (2D) and computed tomographic (CT) simulations were enrolled in the study. Central lung distance (CLD), maximal heart distance (MHD), and maximal heart length (MHL) were measured under virtual simulation. Four plans were compared for each patient. Plan A used a traditional 2D tangential setup. Plan B used clinical target volume (CTV) based three-dimensional (3D) planning. Both plans C and D used a combination of a medial breast field with shallow tangents. Plan D is a further modification of plan C. RESULTS: Under the traditional tangential setup, the mean ipsilateral lung dose and volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated linearly with CLD (R = 0.85 approximately 0.91). The mean ipsilateral lung dose (Gy) approximated 4 times the CLD value (cm), whereas the percentage volume ({\%}) of ipsilateral lung at 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 10 times the CLD (cm). The mean heart dose and percentage volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated with MHD (R = 0.76 approximately 0.80) and MHL (R = 0.65 approximately 0.75). The mean heart dose (Gy) approximated 3 times the MHD value (cm), and the percentage volume ({\%}) of the heart at 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 6 times MHD (cm). Radiation technique impacted lung and heart dose. The 3D tangential plan (plan B) failed to reduce the volumetric dose of lung and heart from that of the 2D plan (plan A). The medial breast techniques (plans C and D) significantly decreased the volume of lung and heart receiving high doses (30 and 40 Gy). Plan D further decreased the 20 Gy volumes. By use of the medial breast technique, the lung and heart dose were not impacted by original CLD and MHD/MHL. Therefore, the improvement from the tangential technique was more remarkable for patients with CLD >or= 3.0 cm (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The CLD and MHD impact the volumetric dose of lung and heart. The application of 3D planning for tangential breast irradiation does not decrease heart and lung dose. Adding a medial breast port significantly decreases percentage volume (PV) of lung and heart receiving high doses, especially when the CLD is excessive.",
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T1 - The impact of central lung distance, maximal heart distance, and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of the lung and heart for intact breast radiation.

AU - Kong, Feng Ming

AU - Klein, Eric E.

AU - Bradley, Jeffrey D.

AU - Mansur, David B.

AU - Taylor, Marie E.

AU - Perez, Carlos A.

AU - Myerson, Robert J.

AU - Harms, William B.

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N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of radiographic parameter and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of lung and heart for intact breast radiation. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Forty patients with both two-dimensional (2D) and computed tomographic (CT) simulations were enrolled in the study. Central lung distance (CLD), maximal heart distance (MHD), and maximal heart length (MHL) were measured under virtual simulation. Four plans were compared for each patient. Plan A used a traditional 2D tangential setup. Plan B used clinical target volume (CTV) based three-dimensional (3D) planning. Both plans C and D used a combination of a medial breast field with shallow tangents. Plan D is a further modification of plan C. RESULTS: Under the traditional tangential setup, the mean ipsilateral lung dose and volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated linearly with CLD (R = 0.85 approximately 0.91). The mean ipsilateral lung dose (Gy) approximated 4 times the CLD value (cm), whereas the percentage volume (%) of ipsilateral lung at 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 10 times the CLD (cm). The mean heart dose and percentage volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated with MHD (R = 0.76 approximately 0.80) and MHL (R = 0.65 approximately 0.75). The mean heart dose (Gy) approximated 3 times the MHD value (cm), and the percentage volume (%) of the heart at 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 6 times MHD (cm). Radiation technique impacted lung and heart dose. The 3D tangential plan (plan B) failed to reduce the volumetric dose of lung and heart from that of the 2D plan (plan A). The medial breast techniques (plans C and D) significantly decreased the volume of lung and heart receiving high doses (30 and 40 Gy). Plan D further decreased the 20 Gy volumes. By use of the medial breast technique, the lung and heart dose were not impacted by original CLD and MHD/MHL. Therefore, the improvement from the tangential technique was more remarkable for patients with CLD >or= 3.0 cm (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The CLD and MHD impact the volumetric dose of lung and heart. The application of 3D planning for tangential breast irradiation does not decrease heart and lung dose. Adding a medial breast port significantly decreases percentage volume (PV) of lung and heart receiving high doses, especially when the CLD is excessive.

AB - PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of radiographic parameter and radiation technique on the volumetric dose of lung and heart for intact breast radiation. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Forty patients with both two-dimensional (2D) and computed tomographic (CT) simulations were enrolled in the study. Central lung distance (CLD), maximal heart distance (MHD), and maximal heart length (MHL) were measured under virtual simulation. Four plans were compared for each patient. Plan A used a traditional 2D tangential setup. Plan B used clinical target volume (CTV) based three-dimensional (3D) planning. Both plans C and D used a combination of a medial breast field with shallow tangents. Plan D is a further modification of plan C. RESULTS: Under the traditional tangential setup, the mean ipsilateral lung dose and volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated linearly with CLD (R = 0.85 approximately 0.91). The mean ipsilateral lung dose (Gy) approximated 4 times the CLD value (cm), whereas the percentage volume (%) of ipsilateral lung at 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 10 times the CLD (cm). The mean heart dose and percentage volume at 20, 30, and 40 Gy correlated with MHD (R = 0.76 approximately 0.80) and MHL (R = 0.65 approximately 0.75). The mean heart dose (Gy) approximated 3 times the MHD value (cm), and the percentage volume (%) of the heart at 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy was about 6 times MHD (cm). Radiation technique impacted lung and heart dose. The 3D tangential plan (plan B) failed to reduce the volumetric dose of lung and heart from that of the 2D plan (plan A). The medial breast techniques (plans C and D) significantly decreased the volume of lung and heart receiving high doses (30 and 40 Gy). Plan D further decreased the 20 Gy volumes. By use of the medial breast technique, the lung and heart dose were not impacted by original CLD and MHD/MHL. Therefore, the improvement from the tangential technique was more remarkable for patients with CLD >or= 3.0 cm (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The CLD and MHD impact the volumetric dose of lung and heart. The application of 3D planning for tangential breast irradiation does not decrease heart and lung dose. Adding a medial breast port significantly decreases percentage volume (PV) of lung and heart receiving high doses, especially when the CLD is excessive.

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