The impact of systematic point-of-care ultrasound on management of patients in a resource-limited setting

Alastair Stanley, Bahati M.K. Wajanga, Hyasinta Jaka, Rachael Purcell, Lauren Byrne, Felicity Williams, Candace Rypien, Abigail Sharpe, Patrick Laws, Lucas Faustine, Tshepo Leeme, Emmanuel Mwabutwa, Robert Peck, Matthew Stephens, Daniel A Kaminstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although target point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography has been shown to benefit patients in resourcelimited settings, it is not clear whether a systematic POC ultrasound assessment in these settings can also lead to similar changes in patient management. A predefined systematic set of POC ultrasound scans were performed on inpatients at a tertiary referral hospital in Tanzania to see if this resulted in changes to patient management. Of the 55 patients scanned, an abnormality was detected in 75% (N = 41), and a change in patient management was recommended or implemented on the basis of POC ultrasound findings in 53% (N = 29). The main impact was earlier initiation of treatment due to more rapid and accurate diagnosis. Further research is warranted to determine whether systematic POC ultrasonography would result in improved patient outcomes in resource-limited settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)488-492
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume96
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Point-of-Care Systems
Ultrasonography
Tanzania
Tertiary Care Centers
Inpatients
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

The impact of systematic point-of-care ultrasound on management of patients in a resource-limited setting. / Stanley, Alastair; Wajanga, Bahati M.K.; Jaka, Hyasinta; Purcell, Rachael; Byrne, Lauren; Williams, Felicity; Rypien, Candace; Sharpe, Abigail; Laws, Patrick; Faustine, Lucas; Leeme, Tshepo; Mwabutwa, Emmanuel; Peck, Robert; Stephens, Matthew; Kaminstein, Daniel A.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 96, No. 2, 01.01.2017, p. 488-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stanley, A, Wajanga, BMK, Jaka, H, Purcell, R, Byrne, L, Williams, F, Rypien, C, Sharpe, A, Laws, P, Faustine, L, Leeme, T, Mwabutwa, E, Peck, R, Stephens, M & Kaminstein, DA 2017, 'The impact of systematic point-of-care ultrasound on management of patients in a resource-limited setting', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 96, no. 2, pp. 488-492. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0201
Stanley, Alastair ; Wajanga, Bahati M.K. ; Jaka, Hyasinta ; Purcell, Rachael ; Byrne, Lauren ; Williams, Felicity ; Rypien, Candace ; Sharpe, Abigail ; Laws, Patrick ; Faustine, Lucas ; Leeme, Tshepo ; Mwabutwa, Emmanuel ; Peck, Robert ; Stephens, Matthew ; Kaminstein, Daniel A. / The impact of systematic point-of-care ultrasound on management of patients in a resource-limited setting. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2017 ; Vol. 96, No. 2. pp. 488-492.
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