The intersection of physician wellbeing and clinical application of diabetes guidelines

Dean Seehusen, Justin Deavers, Arch G. Mainous, Christy J.W. Ledford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Prediabetes (preDM) and diabetes are complex conditions that place significant strain on medical providers. This can have a negative impact on providers’ wellbeing and could impact clinical decisions. We investigated the interplay of caring for patients with prediabetes, physician mental wellbeing, and clinical care. Methods: Using the theory of planned behavior, we conducted a secondary analysis to evaluate physicians’ self-reported provision of care to patients with preDM. We evaluated the effect of mental wellbeing and perceived barriers to caring for patients with preDM. Results: Among 1015 academic physicians, a greater perception of barriers to care and a higher percentage of patients seen with preDM were both significantly associated with a less positive physician state of mind. Physician state of mind was not associated with self-reported clinical behavior. Physician perception of patient barriers has a positive correlation with their likelihood of prescribing metformin for preDM. Conclusions: Caring for a larger proportion of patients with preDM is associated with worse mental wellbeing. Physician attitudes and subjective norms may predict adherence to guidelines, while physician attitudes and wellbeing affect self-reported prescribing behavior. Practice implications: Future research should evaluate ways to lessen the psychological burden of caring for patients with diabetes and preDM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)894-899
Number of pages6
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume101
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Guidelines
Physicians
Prediabetic State
Guideline Adherence
Metformin
Patient Care
Psychology

Keywords

  • Barriers
  • Burnout
  • Clinical guidelines
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Mental wellbeing
  • Prediabetes
  • Theory of planned behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The intersection of physician wellbeing and clinical application of diabetes guidelines. / Seehusen, Dean; Deavers, Justin; Mainous, Arch G.; Ledford, Christy J.W.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 101, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 894-899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seehusen, Dean ; Deavers, Justin ; Mainous, Arch G. ; Ledford, Christy J.W. / The intersection of physician wellbeing and clinical application of diabetes guidelines. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2018 ; Vol. 101, No. 5. pp. 894-899.
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