The management of the shoulder prosthesis infection

L. A. Crosby

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Infection following total shoulder arthroplasty, although uncommon, can be a devastating complication. The established incidence ranges from 0% to 3.9% [1]. Patients commonly present with pain; many show radiographic evidence of loosening. Unlike management of total knee and hip arthroplasty, management of these infections has limited description in the literature. Treatment options include: suppressive antibiotics, combined joint debridement and antibiotic therapy, resection arthroplasty, primary exchange arthroplasty, and two-stage reimplantation [4].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInfection and Local Treatment in Orthopedic Surgery
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages339-343
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9783540479987
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

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Arthroplasty
Infection
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Replantation
Debridement
Hip
Joints
Pain
Incidence
Therapeutics
Shoulder Prosthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Crosby, L. A. (2007). The management of the shoulder prosthesis infection. In Infection and Local Treatment in Orthopedic Surgery (pp. 339-343). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-47999-4_39

The management of the shoulder prosthesis infection. / Crosby, L. A.

Infection and Local Treatment in Orthopedic Surgery. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007. p. 339-343.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Crosby, LA 2007, The management of the shoulder prosthesis infection. in Infection and Local Treatment in Orthopedic Surgery. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 339-343. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-47999-4_39
Crosby LA. The management of the shoulder prosthesis infection. In Infection and Local Treatment in Orthopedic Surgery. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2007. p. 339-343 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-47999-4_39
Crosby, L. A. / The management of the shoulder prosthesis infection. Infection and Local Treatment in Orthopedic Surgery. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007. pp. 339-343
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