The Neuregulin-1 Receptor ErbB4 Controls Glutamatergic Synapse Maturation and Plasticity

Bo Li, Ran Sook Woo, Lin Mei, Roberto Malinow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

249 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) signaling participates in numerous neurodevelopmental processes. Through linkage analysis, nrg1 has been associated with schizophrenia, although its pathophysiological role is not understood. The prevailing models of schizophrenia invoke hypofunction of the glutamatergic synapse and defects in early development of hippocampal-cortical circuitry. Here, we show that the erbB4 receptor, as a postsynaptic target of NRG1, plays a key role in activity-dependent maturation and plasticity of excitatory synaptic structure and function. Synaptic activity leads to the activation and recruitment of erbB4 into the synapse. Overexpressed erbB4 selectively enhances AMPA synaptic currents and increases dendritic spine size. Preventing NRG1/erbB4 signaling destabilizes synaptic AMPA receptors and leads to loss of synaptic NMDA currents and spines. Our results indicate that normal activity-driven glutamatergic synapse development is impaired by genetic deficits in NRG1/erbB4 signaling leading to glutamatergic hypofunction. These findings link proposed effectors in schizophrenia: NRG1/erbB4 signaling perturbation, neurodevelopmental deficit, and glutamatergic hypofunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-597
Number of pages15
JournalNeuron
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2007

Fingerprint

Neuregulin-1
Synapses
Schizophrenia
Dendritic Spines
alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid
Neurotransmitter Receptor
Neuronal Plasticity
AMPA Receptors
N-Methylaspartate
Spine

Keywords

  • CELLBIO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The Neuregulin-1 Receptor ErbB4 Controls Glutamatergic Synapse Maturation and Plasticity. / Li, Bo; Woo, Ran Sook; Mei, Lin; Malinow, Roberto.

In: Neuron, Vol. 54, No. 4, 24.05.2007, p. 583-597.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Bo ; Woo, Ran Sook ; Mei, Lin ; Malinow, Roberto. / The Neuregulin-1 Receptor ErbB4 Controls Glutamatergic Synapse Maturation and Plasticity. In: Neuron. 2007 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 583-597.
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