The neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy

W. O. Tatum IV, S. R. Benbadis, Fernando Vale Diaz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the new advancements in antiepileptic drug development, thousands of people with epilepsy will remain intractable to medication. For a considerable proportion of these people, epilepsy surgery is a consideration for better control of their seizures. Resective surgery is now standard practice for patients with medication-refractory epilepsy. Temporal lobectomy continues to be the most common surgery performed. Once patients fail 2 to 3 optimal trials of antiepileptic medication, further drug therapy offers a minimal number of patients freedom from seizures. In contrast, temporal lobectomy in carefully selected patients may result in seizure-free outcomes in more than 70% to 90% of patients with intractable seizures. As technology and drug availability increases in the new millennium, it is important for the primary care physician to be aware of epilepsy surgery as a means to treat patients with antiepileptic drug-refractory epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1142-1147
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Family Medicine
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Epilepsy
Seizures
Anticonvulsants
Therapeutics
Primary Care Physicians
Technology
Drug Therapy
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy. / Tatum IV, W. O.; Benbadis, S. R.; Vale Diaz, Fernando.

In: Archives of Family Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 10, 01.01.2000, p. 1142-1147.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Tatum IV, W. O. ; Benbadis, S. R. ; Vale Diaz, Fernando. / The neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy. In: Archives of Family Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 9, No. 10. pp. 1142-1147.
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