The next generation of therapies for chronic myeloid leukemia.

Alfonso Quintás-Cardama, Jorge E. Cortés

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Therapy with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) represents the current standard first-line therapy for the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Although most patients respond satisfactorily to imatinib, a subset of patients develops resistance mainly because of the acquisition of mutations within the kinase domain of BCR-ABL1 that impair the ability of TKIs to block the activity of the enzyme. Moreover, BCR-ABL1 transcripts can be detected in most patients by molecular techniques, underscoring the limitations of imatinib to eradicate minimal residual disease. Although the resistance conferred by most BCR-ABL1 mutations can be overcome with the use of second-generation TKIs such as nilotinib, dasastinib, bosutinib, or bafetinib, the T315I mutation, which represents a common resistance pathway in CML, remains unassailable to TKI therapy. We herein discuss current research efforts in 2 areas of vital importance in CML research, the management of patients with imatinib-resistant mutations, with particular emphasis on those carrying T315I, and the eradication of residual disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S395-403
JournalClinical lymphoma & myeloma
Volume9 Suppl 4
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Mutation
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Disease Eradication
Therapeutics
Residual Neoplasm
Research
Phosphotransferases
Enzymes
Imatinib Mesylate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

The next generation of therapies for chronic myeloid leukemia. / Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Cortés, Jorge E.

In: Clinical lymphoma & myeloma, Vol. 9 Suppl 4, 2009, p. S395-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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