The Psychological Profile of White-collar Offenders: Demographics, Criminal Thinking, Psychopathic Traits, and Psychopathology

Laurie Lynn Ragatz, William Fremouw, Edward Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors replicated Walters and Geyer (2004) by examining how white-collar offenders differ from non-white-collar offenders on criminal thinking and lifestyle criminality. To extend Walters and Geyer's work, they explored psychopathic characteristics and psychopathology of white-collar offenders compared with non-white-collar offenders. The study sample included 39 white-collar only offenders (offenders who had committed only white-collar crime), 88 white-collar versatile offenders (offenders who previously had committed non-white-collar crime), and 86 non-white-collar offenders incarcerated in a federal prison. Groups were matched on age and ethnicity. Offenders completed self-report measures of criminal thinking, psychopathic traits, and psychopathology. Lifestyle criminality was gathered via file review. Results demonstrated white-collar offenders had lower scores on lifestyle criminality but scored higher on some measures of psychopathology and psychopathic traits compared with non-white-collar offenders. White-collar versatile offenders were highest in criminal thinking. Logistic regression findings demonstrated that white-collar offenders could be distinguished from non-white-collar offenders by substance use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)978-997
Number of pages20
JournalCriminal Justice and Behavior
Volume39
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

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psychopathology
Psychopathology
offender
Demography
Psychology
Criminality
Life Style
Thinking
Crime
offense
Prisons
Self Report
correctional institution

Keywords

  • criminal thinking
  • psychopathy
  • white-collar criminals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology(all)
  • Law

Cite this

The Psychological Profile of White-collar Offenders : Demographics, Criminal Thinking, Psychopathic Traits, and Psychopathology. / Ragatz, Laurie Lynn; Fremouw, William; Baker, Edward.

In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 7, 01.07.2012, p. 978-997.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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