The relationship between cognitive fusion, stigma, and well-being in people with multiple sclerosis

Abbey Valvano, Rebecca M. Floyd, Lauren Penwell-Waines, Lara M Stepleman, Kimberly Lewis, Amy S House

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive fusion plays a mediating role in the effects of Multiple Sclerosis (MS)-related stigma on psychological distress and well-being. One hundred twenty-eight adults diagnosed with MS and receiving care at an outpatient MS Center in the Southeastern U.S. completed measures of stigma, cognitive fusion, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Mediation analyses indicated that cognitive fusion can mediate the effects of stigma on depression, anxiety, and quality of life. These findings are unique in suggesting that cognitive fusion may be an important clinical consideration in treating the effects of MS-related stigma on psychological health and well-being. Reverse mediation also suggests that cognitive fusion is directly and indirectly affected by stigma, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Appropriate next steps would include longitudinal research to better clarify the directional relationships between these variables and testing an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention for increasing psychological flexibility in people with MS in order to reduce the impact of experiences of stigma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-270
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Contextual Behavioral Science
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

multiple sclerosis
sclerosis
quality of life
stigma
Multiple Sclerosis
well-being
anxiety
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Depression
Psychology
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
mediation
Ambulatory Care
distress
effect
Fusion
Well-being
Stigma
Multiple sclerosis

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Cognitive fusion
  • Depression
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Quality of life
  • Stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

The relationship between cognitive fusion, stigma, and well-being in people with multiple sclerosis. / Valvano, Abbey; Floyd, Rebecca M.; Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Stepleman, Lara M; Lewis, Kimberly; House, Amy S.

In: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. 266-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Valvano, Abbey ; Floyd, Rebecca M. ; Penwell-Waines, Lauren ; Stepleman, Lara M ; Lewis, Kimberly ; House, Amy S. / The relationship between cognitive fusion, stigma, and well-being in people with multiple sclerosis. In: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science. 2016 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 266-270.
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