The role of endotoxin and its receptors in allergic disease

L. Keoki Williams, Dennis R. Ownby, Mary J. Maliarik, Christine C. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To summarize the existing literature on the association of endotoxin with respiratory diseases and allergic sensitization and to review the potentially modifying effects of endotoxin receptor polymorphisms. Data Sources: English-language articles were identified from the MEDLINE and PubMed databases using combinations of the following search terms: endotoxin, toll-like receptor, polymorphisms, atopy, asthma, and allergy. Other sources included experts in the field and the bibliographies of pertinent articles. Study Selection: Relevant articles were selected based on the authors' expert opinion. Results: Cross-sectional studies, particularly those of children raised in rural European communities, suggest that early endotoxin exposure may protect against the development of allergic sensitization and atopic asthma. However, endotoxin exposure may also contribute to other nonatopic respiratory disorders and may exacerbate disease in individuals with preexisting asthma. Paradoxically, among individuals exposed to high levels of endotoxin, carriers of a functional mutation in toll-like receptor 4, which reduces cellular responsiveness to endotoxin, may be at lower risk of developing allergic sensitization. Conclusions: The effect of endotoxin exposure on allergic sensitization and asthma appears to be influenced by the timing of exposure, the presence or absence of preexisting disease, and polymorphisms in the genes that encode endotoxin receptors. Further studies are needed to define the window period for this effect, as well as the underlying immunologic mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-332
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume94
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

Fingerprint

Endotoxins
Asthma
Toll-Like Receptor 4
Preexisting Condition Coverage
Toll-Like Receptors
Information Storage and Retrieval
Expert Testimony
Bibliography
Rural Population
European Union
endotoxin receptor
PubMed
MEDLINE
Hypersensitivity
Language
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases
Mutation
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

The role of endotoxin and its receptors in allergic disease. / Williams, L. Keoki; Ownby, Dennis R.; Maliarik, Mary J.; Johnson, Christine C.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 94, No. 3, 01.03.2005, p. 323-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Williams, L. Keoki ; Ownby, Dennis R. ; Maliarik, Mary J. ; Johnson, Christine C. / The role of endotoxin and its receptors in allergic disease. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2005 ; Vol. 94, No. 3. pp. 323-332.
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