The scientific and clinical basis for the treatment of Parkinson disease (2009)

C. Warren Olanow, Matthew B. Stern, Kapil Sethi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

509 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parkinson disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that affects as many as 1-2% of persons aged 60 years and older. With the aging of the population, the frequency of PD is expected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. Current therapy is largely based on a dopamine replacement strategy, primarily using the dopamine precursor levodopa. However, chronic treatment is associated with the development of motor complications, and the disease is inexorably progressive. Further, advancing disease is associated with the emergence of features such as freezing, falling, and dementia which are not adequately controlled with dopaminergic therapies. Indeed, it is now appreciated that these nondopaminergic features are common and the major source of disability for patients with advanced disease. Many different therapeutic agents and treatment strategies have been evaluated over the past several years to try and address these unmet medical needs, and many promising approaches are currently being tested in the laboratory and in the clinic. As a result, there are now many new therapies and strategic approaches available for the treatment of the different stages of PD, with which the treating physician must be familiar in order to provide patients with optimal care. This monograph provides an overview of the management of PD patients, with an emphasis on pathophysiology, and the results of recent clinical trials. It is intended to provide physicians with an understanding of the different treatment options that are available for managing the different stages of the disease and the scientific rationale of the different approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S1-S136
JournalNeurology
Volume72
Issue number21 SUPPL. 4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 26 2009

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Parkinson Disease
Therapeutics
Dopamine
Accidental Falls
Physicians
Levodopa
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Freezing
Dementia
Clinical Trials
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The scientific and clinical basis for the treatment of Parkinson disease (2009). / Olanow, C. Warren; Stern, Matthew B.; Sethi, Kapil.

In: Neurology, Vol. 72, No. 21 SUPPL. 4, 26.05.2009, p. S1-S136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Olanow, C. Warren ; Stern, Matthew B. ; Sethi, Kapil. / The scientific and clinical basis for the treatment of Parkinson disease (2009). In: Neurology. 2009 ; Vol. 72, No. 21 SUPPL. 4. pp. S1-S136.
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