The spectrum of lymphoblastic, nodal and extranodal T-cell lymphomas: Characteristic features and diagnostic dilemmas

Natasha Marie Savage, Ryan C. Johnson, Yasodha Natkunam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

T-cell lymphomas represent a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that encompass considerable clinical, morphologic, and immunophenotypic variation. The diagnosis of T-cell lymphoma is challenging because of its relative rarity, the lack of an immunophenotypic marker of clonality, and significant morphologic overlap with infectious/inflammatory processes and neoplasms, including Hodgkin and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and even mesenchymal or epithelial lesions. In the current World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic tumors, all except 1 subtype (ie, T-lymphoblastic lymphoma) are recognized as mature neoplasms derived from postthymic T cells. In addition to T-lymphoblastic lymphoma, this review will focus on nodal and extranodal T-cell lymphomas and exclude T-cell lymphomas presenting primarily in the skin. Extranodal natural-killer-cell/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, will also be discussed because the derivation of this lymphoma from natural killer and natural killer-like T cells shows morphologic and immunophenotypic features that overlap with other T-cell lymphomas. In this review, we discuss the salient clinicopathologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features, as well as our approaches to the diagnosis of lymphoblastic, nodal, and extranodal T-cell lymphomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-471
Number of pages21
JournalHuman Pathology
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

T-Cell Lymphoma
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Neoplasms
Natural Killer T-Cells
Hodgkin Disease
Nose
Natural Killer Cells
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Lymphoma
T-Lymphocytes
Skin

Keywords

  • Clonality
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • T cells
  • T-cell receptor gene rearrangement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

The spectrum of lymphoblastic, nodal and extranodal T-cell lymphomas : Characteristic features and diagnostic dilemmas. / Savage, Natasha Marie; Johnson, Ryan C.; Natkunam, Yasodha.

In: Human Pathology, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 451-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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