The status of pediatric surgical rotations by residents in pediatrics

David A. Rogers, John T. Benjamin, Robyn M Hatley, Charles G. Howell, Sharon M. Beall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A variety of forces are reshaping the traditional relationship between physicians and their patients. One consequence of this reform movement will be increased responsibility of the pediatrician to evaluate children with surgical diseases. Pediatricians also will be encouraged to do more of the minor surgical procedures themselves. It is not clear how academic pediatric surgeons should adapt to these changes to assure that the general pediatrician is equipped with the skills to handle this increased responsibility. One obvious solution would be to have the pediatrician in training rotate on the pediatric surgery service. The authors have considered these issues at their institution, and thus became interested in learning the status of pediatric surgical rotations by pediatric house staff in this country. A survey was distributed to the 221 accredited pediatric training programs in this country, and 143 individuals responded. Only thirty-five of these programs require a rotation on pediatric surgery. Eighty-six programs offer it as an elective, but only a minority of house staff takes it. The most disturbing aspect of the survey was that 28 of the programs had required a pediatric surgical rotation in the past but had eliminated it. The most common reasons given for this action were the poor educational content of the rotation and the labor requirements of the pediatric service. Based on the survey, the authors believe that it is unlikely that mandatory rotations on pediatric surgery will be begun in pediatric training curriculums. If pediatric surgeons wish to be involved in training pediatricians, they will need to address the educational content of their electives to meet the changing educational needs of the pediatricians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1362-1363
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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Pediatrics
Internship and Residency
Minor Surgical Procedures
Curriculum
Pediatricians
Learning
Physicians
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Residents, pediatrics
  • rotations, surgical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

The status of pediatric surgical rotations by residents in pediatrics. / Rogers, David A.; Benjamin, John T.; Hatley, Robyn M; Howell, Charles G.; Beall, Sharon M.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 31, No. 10, 01.01.1996, p. 1362-1363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rogers, David A. ; Benjamin, John T. ; Hatley, Robyn M ; Howell, Charles G. ; Beall, Sharon M. / The status of pediatric surgical rotations by residents in pediatrics. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 1996 ; Vol. 31, No. 10. pp. 1362-1363.
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