Therapeutic inducers of the HSP70/HSP110 protect mice against traumatic brain injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces severe harm and disability in many accident victims and combat-related activities. The heat-shock proteins Hsp70/Hsp110 protect cells against death and ischemic damage. In this study, we used mice deficient in Hsp110 or Hsp70 to examine their potential requirement following TBI. Data indicate that loss of Hsp110 or Hsp70 increases brain injury and death of neurons. One of the mechanisms underlying the increased cell death observed in the absence of Hsp110 and Hsp70 following TBI is the increased expression of reactive oxygen species-induced p53 target genes Pig1, Pig8, and Pig12. To examine whether drugs that increase the levels of Hsp70/Hsp110 can protect cells against TBI, we subjected mice to TBI and administered Celastrol or BGP-15. In contrast to Hsp110- or Hsp70i-deficient mice that were not protected following TBI and Celastrol treatment, there was a significant improvement of wild-type mice following administration of these drugs during the first week following TBI. In addition, assessment of neurological injury shows significant improvement in contextual and cued fear conditioning tests and beam balance in wild-type mice that were treated with Celastrol or BGP-15 following TBI compared to TBI-treated mice. These studies indicate a significant role of Hsp70/Hsp110 in neuronal survival following TBI and the beneficial effects of Hsp70/Hsp110 inducers toward reducing the pathological consequences of TBI. Our data indicate that loss of Hsp110 or Hsp70 in mice increases brain injury following TBI. (a) One of the mechanisms underlying the increased cell death observed in the absence of these Hsps following TBI is the increased expression of ROS-induced p53 target genes known as Pigs. In addition, (b) using drugs (Celastrol or BGP-15) to increase Hsp70/Hsp110 levels protect cells against TBI, suggesting the beneficial effects of Hsp70/Hsp110 inducers to reduce the pathological consequences of TBI. Our data indicate that loss of Hsp110 or Hsp70 in mice increases brain injury following TBI. (a) One of the mechanisms underlying the increased cell death observed in the absence of these Hsps following TBI is the increased expression of ROS-induced p53 target genes known as Pigs. In addition, (b) using drugs (Celastrol or BGP-15) to increase Hsp70/Hsp110 levels protect cells against TBI, suggesting the beneficial effects of Hsp70/Hsp110 inducers to reduce the pathological consequences of TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)626-641
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume130
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Brain
Therapeutics
Cell death
p53 Genes
Cell Death
Brain Injuries
Traumatic Brain Injury
Genes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
HSP110 Heat-Shock Proteins
Swine
Brain Death
Fear
Accidents
Heat-Shock Proteins
Reactive Oxygen Species

Keywords

  • BGP-15
  • Hsp110
  • Hsp70
  • celastrol
  • closed cortical impact
  • knockout mice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Therapeutic inducers of the HSP70/HSP110 protect mice against traumatic brain injury. / Eroglu, Binnur; Kimbler, Donald E.; Pang, Junfeng; Choi, Justin; Moskofidis, Dimitrios; Yanasak, Nathan Eugene; Dhandapani, Krishnan Michael; Mivechi, Nahid F.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 130, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 626-641.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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