Thermal debracketing of orthodontic resins

Frederick A. Rueggeberg, Petra Lockwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten commercial brands of orthodontic bonding materials representing three modes of delivery systems (two-paste, no-mix, and powder/liquid) were used to bond stainless steel brackets to bovine teeth. Heat was applied to the bracket, and the temperature at debonding was noted for each type of resin. The two-paste systems required a higher temperature to debond than did the no-mix systems. The power/liquid system required the lowest temperature. There is a direct relationship between filler content and debonding temperature. There is an inverse exponential relationship between debonding temperature and load needed to cause debracketing. Room-temperature debonding showed failure at the bracket/resin interface with evidence of cohesive enamel fracture. Thermal debonding showed no evidence of overt enamel fracture, and failure site shifted toward the tooth/resin interface. Ceramic brackets required almost twice the time to debracket than did stainless steel brackets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-65
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume98
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1990

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Orthodontics
Hot Temperature
Temperature
Stainless Steel
Dental Enamel
Ointments
Tooth
Ceramics
Powders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

Thermal debracketing of orthodontic resins. / Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Lockwood, Petra.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Vol. 98, No. 1, 07.1990, p. 56-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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