Top poems of 2017 consistent with the principles of the choosing wisely campaign

Roland Grad, Mark H. Ebell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article discusses the POEMs (patient-oriented evidence that matters) of 2017 judged to be most consistent with the principles of the Choosing Wisely campaign. A POEM is a synopsis of a research study that reports patient-oriented outcomes, such as improvement in symptoms, quality of life, or mortality; is free of important methodologic bias; and recommends a change in practice for many physicians. We selected these POEMs through a crowdsourcing strategy of the daily POEMs information service for physician-members of the Canadian Medical Association. Recommendations are presented from these top POEMs of primary research or meta-analysis as interventions to consider avoiding in practice. The recommendations cover musculoskeletal conditions (e.g., avoid arthroscopy for initial treatment of a meniscal tear), respiratory disease (e.g., avoid screening for lung cancer without informing your patient of the risk of a false-positive test result), infections (e.g., do not routinely add trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole to cephalexin for nonpurulent uncomplicated cellulitis), and cardiovascular disease (e.g., do not prescribe niacin, alone or in combination with a statin, to prevent cardiovascular disease). These POEMs describe interventions whose benefits are not superior to other options, are sometimes more expensive, or put patients at increased risk of harm. Knowing more about these POEMs and their connection with the Choosing Wisely campaign will help clinicians and their patients engage in conversations that are better informed by high-quality evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-98
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican family physician
Volume98
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jul 15 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Crowdsourcing
Cardiovascular Diseases
Physicians
Cephalexin
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Cellulitis
Information Services
Niacin
Arthroscopy
Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
Tears
Meta-Analysis
Lung Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Mortality
Infection
Research
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Top poems of 2017 consistent with the principles of the choosing wisely campaign. / Grad, Roland; Ebell, Mark H.

In: American family physician, Vol. 98, No. 2, 15.07.2018, p. 93-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grad, Roland ; Ebell, Mark H. / Top poems of 2017 consistent with the principles of the choosing wisely campaign. In: American family physician. 2018 ; Vol. 98, No. 2. pp. 93-98.
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