Total knee replacement in a patient with lupus anticoagulant.

U. T. Bhagia, Raymond S Corpe, D. Steflik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The lupus anticoagulant is an acquired circulating anticoagulant that was first described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This rare hematologic entity is seen in about 1% to 2% of the general population and about 10% to 35% of the patients with SLE. Although associated with a prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT), the lupus anticoagulant does not cause bleeding complications but may be associated with an increase in thromboembolic complications. This report is presented to alert orthopedic surgeons of the increased risk of thromboembolic disease with a paradoxically prolonged PTT in patients with the lupus anticoagulant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-234
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Southern Orthopaedic Association
Volume6
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Hemorrhage
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Total knee replacement in a patient with lupus anticoagulant. / Bhagia, U. T.; Corpe, Raymond S; Steflik, D.

In: Journal of the Southern Orthopaedic Association, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.01.1997, p. 231-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bhagia, UT, Corpe, RS & Steflik, D 1997, 'Total knee replacement in a patient with lupus anticoagulant.', Journal of the Southern Orthopaedic Association, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 231-234.
Bhagia, U. T. ; Corpe, Raymond S ; Steflik, D. / Total knee replacement in a patient with lupus anticoagulant. In: Journal of the Southern Orthopaedic Association. 1997 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 231-234.
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