Training directors' opinions about the psychiatry resident in-training examination (PRITE)

Lynn C. Webb, Sandra Griffin Bishop Sexson, James Scully, Charles F. Reynolds, Miles F. Shore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The American College of Psychiatrists conducted research to validate the content outline of the Psychiatry Resident In-Training Examination (PRITE) and to assess what residency training directors think about the examination. Method: A mail survey was sent to the 218 psychiatry residency training directors who subscribe to the PRITE. Results: The survey response rate was 70%. A majority of the respondents indicated agreement with the relative emphasis given to each content area in the PRITE (range=52%-80% agreement). Eighty-one percent of the respondents were strongly in favor of continuing the practice of releasing the examination and the correct responses each year after the examinations have been scored. The majority of the respondents use results on the PRITE for individual resident evaluation and program evaluation (90% and 94%, respectively). Very few respondents use the PRITE results as the sole measure for assessing residents' cognitive competence or use it for marketing their residency programs. Conclusions: The survey provided strong support for the content areas covered in the PRITE and their relative emphases. The current practice of releasing PRITE items and answers (a main difference between the PRITE and the certification examination of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology) was well supported by the survey results. The stated purpose of the PRITE, to provide educationally useful feedback for individuals and groups in the form of comparisons with peers in specific areas of knowledge, was supported by a large majority of the respondents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-524
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume149
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Psychiatry
Internship and Residency
Surveys and Questionnaires
Certification
Program Evaluation
Postal Service
Neurology
Marketing
Mental Competency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Training directors' opinions about the psychiatry resident in-training examination (PRITE). / Webb, Lynn C.; Sexson, Sandra Griffin Bishop; Scully, James; Reynolds, Charles F.; Shore, Miles F.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 149, No. 4, 01.01.1992, p. 521-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Webb, Lynn C. ; Sexson, Sandra Griffin Bishop ; Scully, James ; Reynolds, Charles F. ; Shore, Miles F. / Training directors' opinions about the psychiatry resident in-training examination (PRITE). In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 1992 ; Vol. 149, No. 4. pp. 521-524.
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