Translating mammary stem cell and cancer stem cell biology to the clinics

Rajneesh Pathania, Vadivel Ganapathy, Muthusamy Thangaraju

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Breast cancer, one of the most deadly diseases in women, is a hierarchical entity comprising heterogeneous populations of cells with genetic or epigenetic alterations that allow them to grow as a tumor and subsequently cause metastasis. Since past 70 years, several classes of chemotherapeutic agents have been developed which are used widely for treatment of breast cancer, and yet the breast cancer has not been eradicated. In the past two decades, stem cells have become the holy grail of biomedical research because the biology of these cells has potential to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis of not only cancer but also several other diseases as well as to foster new avenues for the design and development of novel classes of drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Further, stem cells can be used as a vector for gene therapy to treat diseases like cancer because stem cells can migrate relatively long distances, not only to the sites of injury and infection, but also to initial sites of tumor. Identification of mammary stem cells and cancer stem cells raises new hopes for the treatment of breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that cancer stem cells have similar property to the normal stem cells, but have the characteristic feature of increased self-renewal compared to normal stem cells. Stem cells also play an important role in carcinogenesis; thus understanding the role of stem cells in malignant transformation will have far-reaching implications in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer as well as for the discovery of new treatment modalities to completely obliterate several human malignancies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStem Cells and Human Diseases
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages433-450
Number of pages18
Volume9789400728011
ISBN (Print)9789400728011, 940072800X, 9789400728004
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014

Fingerprint

Neoplastic Stem Cells
Cell Biology
Breast
Stem Cells
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Epigenomics
Genetic Therapy
Biomedical Research
Carcinogenesis
Neoplasm Metastasis
Wounds and Injuries
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population

Keywords

  • Cancer stem cells
  • Drug resistance
  • Self-renewal
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pathania, R., Ganapathy, V., & Thangaraju, M. (2014). Translating mammary stem cell and cancer stem cell biology to the clinics. In Stem Cells and Human Diseases (Vol. 9789400728011, pp. 433-450). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-2801-1_19

Translating mammary stem cell and cancer stem cell biology to the clinics. / Pathania, Rajneesh; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Thangaraju, Muthusamy.

Stem Cells and Human Diseases. Vol. 9789400728011 Springer Netherlands, 2014. p. 433-450.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Pathania, R, Ganapathy, V & Thangaraju, M 2014, Translating mammary stem cell and cancer stem cell biology to the clinics. in Stem Cells and Human Diseases. vol. 9789400728011, Springer Netherlands, pp. 433-450. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-2801-1_19
Pathania R, Ganapathy V, Thangaraju M. Translating mammary stem cell and cancer stem cell biology to the clinics. In Stem Cells and Human Diseases. Vol. 9789400728011. Springer Netherlands. 2014. p. 433-450 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-2801-1_19
Pathania, Rajneesh ; Ganapathy, Vadivel ; Thangaraju, Muthusamy. / Translating mammary stem cell and cancer stem cell biology to the clinics. Stem Cells and Human Diseases. Vol. 9789400728011 Springer Netherlands, 2014. pp. 433-450
@inbook{655b9cae6ca943f5924e80b6cda3789b,
title = "Translating mammary stem cell and cancer stem cell biology to the clinics",
abstract = "Breast cancer, one of the most deadly diseases in women, is a hierarchical entity comprising heterogeneous populations of cells with genetic or epigenetic alterations that allow them to grow as a tumor and subsequently cause metastasis. Since past 70 years, several classes of chemotherapeutic agents have been developed which are used widely for treatment of breast cancer, and yet the breast cancer has not been eradicated. In the past two decades, stem cells have become the holy grail of biomedical research because the biology of these cells has potential to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis of not only cancer but also several other diseases as well as to foster new avenues for the design and development of novel classes of drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Further, stem cells can be used as a vector for gene therapy to treat diseases like cancer because stem cells can migrate relatively long distances, not only to the sites of injury and infection, but also to initial sites of tumor. Identification of mammary stem cells and cancer stem cells raises new hopes for the treatment of breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that cancer stem cells have similar property to the normal stem cells, but have the characteristic feature of increased self-renewal compared to normal stem cells. Stem cells also play an important role in carcinogenesis; thus understanding the role of stem cells in malignant transformation will have far-reaching implications in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer as well as for the discovery of new treatment modalities to completely obliterate several human malignancies.",
keywords = "Cancer stem cells, Drug resistance, Self-renewal, Stem cells",
author = "Rajneesh Pathania and Vadivel Ganapathy and Muthusamy Thangaraju",
year = "2014",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-94-007-2801-1_19",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9789400728011",
volume = "9789400728011",
pages = "433--450",
booktitle = "Stem Cells and Human Diseases",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Translating mammary stem cell and cancer stem cell biology to the clinics

AU - Pathania, Rajneesh

AU - Ganapathy, Vadivel

AU - Thangaraju, Muthusamy

PY - 2014/4/1

Y1 - 2014/4/1

N2 - Breast cancer, one of the most deadly diseases in women, is a hierarchical entity comprising heterogeneous populations of cells with genetic or epigenetic alterations that allow them to grow as a tumor and subsequently cause metastasis. Since past 70 years, several classes of chemotherapeutic agents have been developed which are used widely for treatment of breast cancer, and yet the breast cancer has not been eradicated. In the past two decades, stem cells have become the holy grail of biomedical research because the biology of these cells has potential to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis of not only cancer but also several other diseases as well as to foster new avenues for the design and development of novel classes of drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Further, stem cells can be used as a vector for gene therapy to treat diseases like cancer because stem cells can migrate relatively long distances, not only to the sites of injury and infection, but also to initial sites of tumor. Identification of mammary stem cells and cancer stem cells raises new hopes for the treatment of breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that cancer stem cells have similar property to the normal stem cells, but have the characteristic feature of increased self-renewal compared to normal stem cells. Stem cells also play an important role in carcinogenesis; thus understanding the role of stem cells in malignant transformation will have far-reaching implications in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer as well as for the discovery of new treatment modalities to completely obliterate several human malignancies.

AB - Breast cancer, one of the most deadly diseases in women, is a hierarchical entity comprising heterogeneous populations of cells with genetic or epigenetic alterations that allow them to grow as a tumor and subsequently cause metastasis. Since past 70 years, several classes of chemotherapeutic agents have been developed which are used widely for treatment of breast cancer, and yet the breast cancer has not been eradicated. In the past two decades, stem cells have become the holy grail of biomedical research because the biology of these cells has potential to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis of not only cancer but also several other diseases as well as to foster new avenues for the design and development of novel classes of drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Further, stem cells can be used as a vector for gene therapy to treat diseases like cancer because stem cells can migrate relatively long distances, not only to the sites of injury and infection, but also to initial sites of tumor. Identification of mammary stem cells and cancer stem cells raises new hopes for the treatment of breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that cancer stem cells have similar property to the normal stem cells, but have the characteristic feature of increased self-renewal compared to normal stem cells. Stem cells also play an important role in carcinogenesis; thus understanding the role of stem cells in malignant transformation will have far-reaching implications in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer as well as for the discovery of new treatment modalities to completely obliterate several human malignancies.

KW - Cancer stem cells

KW - Drug resistance

KW - Self-renewal

KW - Stem cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84931433029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84931433029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-94-007-2801-1_19

DO - 10.1007/978-94-007-2801-1_19

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84931433029

SN - 9789400728011

SN - 940072800X

SN - 9789400728004

VL - 9789400728011

SP - 433

EP - 450

BT - Stem Cells and Human Diseases

PB - Springer Netherlands

ER -