Transmission of employment shocks before and after the Oklahoma City tornado

Bradley T. Ewing, Jamie B. Kruse, Mark Andrew Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the economic impact of the May 3, 1999 Oklahoma tornado outbreak on the labor markets of Oklahoma City (OK), Wichita (KS), and Kansas City (MO). In particular, this article examines the transmission of shocks to employment growth across these different labor markets. Using monthly employment data from January 1990 to December 2004, we provide empirical evidence on the cross-market relationships that existed before and after the Oklahoma City tornado. The results suggest that the impact of the wind event may have altered labor market dynamics in Oklahoma City, as well as Wichita and Kansas City.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-188
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Hazards
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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tornado
labor market
employment trend
economic impact
event
market
evidence
city

Keywords

  • Employment growth
  • Tornado
  • Vector autoregression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Transmission of employment shocks before and after the Oklahoma City tornado. / Ewing, Bradley T.; Kruse, Jamie B.; Thompson, Mark Andrew.

In: Environmental Hazards, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 181-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ewing, Bradley T. ; Kruse, Jamie B. ; Thompson, Mark Andrew. / Transmission of employment shocks before and after the Oklahoma City tornado. In: Environmental Hazards. 2005 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 181-188.
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