Ultrasonic technology facilitates minimal access thyroid surgery

David J Terris, Melanie W. Seybt, Christine G. Gourin, Edward Chin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Options for controlling the vasculature during thyroid surgery include suture ligatures, vessel clips, and bipolar cautery. Ultrasonic technology represents an alternative to conventional techniques in which the vessels are simultaneously sealed and divided. We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of thyroidectomy with ultrasonic technology. DESIGN: Nonrandomized, prospective analysis of a series of patients undergoing thyroidectomy at the Medical College of Georgia. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The records of 51 consecutive patients who underwent thyroid surgery between December 2004 and June 2005 were reviewed. Patients in whom ultrasonic technology (Harmonic-ACE™, Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Cincinnati, OH) was used comprised the study population. RESULTS: Forty-four of 51 patients underwent thyroidectomy with the assistance of ultrasonic technology. There were 4 males and 40 females with a mean age of 43.5 ± 15.8 years. Twenty-two patients had a total thyroidectomy, 18 underwent unilateral lobectomy, and 4 underwent completion thyroidectomy. The overall mean incision length was 5.0 ± 2.6 (range 2-12) cm. A subgroup of patients underwent minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (n = 13) and had a mean incision length of 29.3 ± 0.8 mm. There were no cases of permanent injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve and no cases of persistent hypoparathyroidism. Blood loss ranged from 5 mL to 100 mL, with a mean of 26.7 ± 21.8 mL. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasonic technology facilitates thyroid surgery, particularly when a minimally invasive approach is undertaken. It reliably seals and divides the thyroid vasculature and will likely replace other methods of managing the thyroid blood supply.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)851-854
Number of pages4
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume116
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

Fingerprint

Thyroidectomy
Ultrasonics
Thyroid Gland
Technology
Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injuries
Cautery
Hypoparathyroidism
Surgical Instruments
Sutures
Ligation
Safety
Population

Keywords

  • Endoscopic
  • Harmonic-ACE™
  • Minimally invasive
  • Thyroid surgery
  • Thyroidectomy
  • Ultrasonic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Ultrasonic technology facilitates minimal access thyroid surgery. / Terris, David J; Seybt, Melanie W.; Gourin, Christine G.; Chin, Edward.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 116, No. 6, 01.06.2006, p. 851-854.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Terris, David J ; Seybt, Melanie W. ; Gourin, Christine G. ; Chin, Edward. / Ultrasonic technology facilitates minimal access thyroid surgery. In: Laryngoscope. 2006 ; Vol. 116, No. 6. pp. 851-854.
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