Ultrasound-guided interscalene block for shoulder dislocation reduction in the ED

Michael Blaivas, Matthew L Lyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Shoulder dislocations are often associated with significant pain, and many emergency physicians choose conscious sedation to achieve reduction. Concerns about oxygenation, airway protection, and aspiration may make some patients poor candidates for conscious sedation. Ideally, complete pain control and muscle relaxation could be achieved without airway compromise. Interscalene nerve blocks are routinely used for shoulder surgery in the operating suite. The equipment required to locate the nerve plexus blindly is typically not available in the ED setting. Recent work has shown that ultrasound guidance is ideal for the interscalene block and would make it possible in the ED. We present 4 cases of patients receiving ultrasound-guided interscalene blocks for pain control and muscle relaxation during shoulder reduction. Complete pain control, muscle relaxation, and joint reduction were achieved in each case.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-296
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006

Fingerprint

Shoulder Dislocation
Muscle Relaxation
Conscious Sedation
Pain
Nerve Block
Emergencies
Joints
Physicians
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Ultrasound-guided interscalene block for shoulder dislocation reduction in the ED. / Blaivas, Michael; Lyon, Matthew L.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.05.2006, p. 293-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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