Understanding reasons for participating in a school-based influenza vaccination program and decision-making dynamics among adolescents and parents

Natasha L. Herbert, Lisa M. Gargano, Julia E. Painter, Jessica M. Sales, Christopher Morfaw, Dennis L Murray, Ralph J. DiClemente, James M. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Influenza remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Vaccinating school-aged children has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the child and in reducing viral transmission to vulnerable groups such as the elderly. This qualitative study sought to identify reasons parents and students participated in a school-based influenza vaccination clinic and to characterize the decision- making process for vaccination. Eight focus groups were conducted with parents and students. Parents and students who participated in the influenza vaccination clinic stated the educational brochure mailed to their home influenced participation in the program. Parents of non-participating students mentioned barriers, such as the lengthy and complicated consent process and suspicions about the vaccine clinic, as contributing to their decision not to vaccinate their child. Vaccinated students reported initiating influenza vaccine discussion with their parents. Parental attitudes and the educational material influenced parents' decision to allow their child to receive influenza vaccine. This novel study explored reasons for participating in a school-based vaccination clinic and the decision-making process between parents and child(ren). Persons running future school-based vaccination clinics may consider hosting an 'information session with a question and answer session' to address parental concerns and assist with the consent process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)663-672
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

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vaccination
Human Influenza
contagious disease
Decision Making
Vaccination
parents
Parents
adolescent
decision making
Students
school
Influenza Vaccines
student
decision-making process
Pamphlets
Focus Groups
morbidity
Vaccines
mortality
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Understanding reasons for participating in a school-based influenza vaccination program and decision-making dynamics among adolescents and parents. / Herbert, Natasha L.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis L; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

In: Health Education Research, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.08.2013, p. 663-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Herbert, NL, Gargano, LM, Painter, JE, Sales, JM, Morfaw, C, Murray, DL, DiClemente, RJ & Hughes, JM 2013, 'Understanding reasons for participating in a school-based influenza vaccination program and decision-making dynamics among adolescents and parents', Health Education Research, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 663-672. https://doi.org/10.1093/her/cyt060
Herbert, Natasha L. ; Gargano, Lisa M. ; Painter, Julia E. ; Sales, Jessica M. ; Morfaw, Christopher ; Murray, Dennis L ; DiClemente, Ralph J. ; Hughes, James M. / Understanding reasons for participating in a school-based influenza vaccination program and decision-making dynamics among adolescents and parents. In: Health Education Research. 2013 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 663-672.
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