Understanding the philosophical foundations of disabilities to maximize the potential of response to intervention (RTI)

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Abstract

Response to intervention (RTI) is an approach that has been implemented in more than 90% of the states in the U.S. The purpose of the study is to advance understanding of what efforts need to be made in order to increase the likelihood that special education professionals will accept RTI. Data used in this study include individual interviews with two principals, three special education teachers (two of whom were school district RTI coaches), one social worker, and one Title I teacher across four K-12 schools. Data were collected and analyzed around four sets of what qualitative methodologists call “grand tour” questions (Bernard, 2001): (1) respondents’ perceptions about data-based decision making, (2) use of evidence-based interventions at each tier, (3) strengths and challenges to achieving effective coordination, and (4) ongoing supports and professional development needs. The participants’ perspectives offer critical information to advance both research and practices related to RTI.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEducational Philosophy and Theory
Volumein press
StatePublished - 2014

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disability
special education
need development
teacher
coach
school
social worker
Response to Intervention
district
decision making
interview
evidence
Special Education

Cite this

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title = "Understanding the philosophical foundations of disabilities to maximize the potential of response to intervention (RTI)",
abstract = "Response to intervention (RTI) is an approach that has been implemented in more than 90{\%} of the states in the U.S. The purpose of the study is to advance understanding of what efforts need to be made in order to increase the likelihood that special education professionals will accept RTI. Data used in this study include individual interviews with two principals, three special education teachers (two of whom were school district RTI coaches), one social worker, and one Title I teacher across four K-12 schools. Data were collected and analyzed around four sets of what qualitative methodologists call “grand tour” questions (Bernard, 2001): (1) respondents’ perceptions about data-based decision making, (2) use of evidence-based interventions at each tier, (3) strengths and challenges to achieving effective coordination, and (4) ongoing supports and professional development needs. The participants’ perspectives offer critical information to advance both research and practices related to RTI.",
author = "Nai-Cheng Kuo",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "in press",
journal = "Educational Philosophy and Theory",
issn = "0013-1857",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

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AU - Kuo, Nai-Cheng

PY - 2014

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AB - Response to intervention (RTI) is an approach that has been implemented in more than 90% of the states in the U.S. The purpose of the study is to advance understanding of what efforts need to be made in order to increase the likelihood that special education professionals will accept RTI. Data used in this study include individual interviews with two principals, three special education teachers (two of whom were school district RTI coaches), one social worker, and one Title I teacher across four K-12 schools. Data were collected and analyzed around four sets of what qualitative methodologists call “grand tour” questions (Bernard, 2001): (1) respondents’ perceptions about data-based decision making, (2) use of evidence-based interventions at each tier, (3) strengths and challenges to achieving effective coordination, and (4) ongoing supports and professional development needs. The participants’ perspectives offer critical information to advance both research and practices related to RTI.

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VL - in press

JO - Educational Philosophy and Theory

JF - Educational Philosophy and Theory

SN - 0013-1857

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