Unexplained hypotension

The spectrum of dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in critical care settings

Anand Chockalingam, Smrita Dorairajan, Meenakshi Bhalla, Kevin C Dellsperger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: To illustrate the clinical and hemodynamic abnormalities caused by dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) in critical care setting. DESIGN:: We reviewed cases referred to Cardiology with echocardiographic evidence of LVOTO and their clinical presentations. We present those cases where LVOTO can transiently occur without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy when inotropic agents are used for hypotension. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Five women in the 50-70 age range and prior history of hypertension presented with various symptoms like chest discomfort, fatigue, dizziness, atrial fibrillation, and hypotension. An ejection systolic murmur was noted most often in the left third intercostal space and ECG revealed ST-T wave abnormalities. LVOTO caused by mitral systolic anterior motion was detected by echocardiography and catheterization excluded acute coronary disease. In critical care setting, LVOTO can occur due to apical ballooning syndrome, coronary disease, medications, volume depletion, and valvular abnormalities. Because this condition mimics acute coronary syndrome or other etiologies of hypotension in medical and surgical intensive care units, appropriate treatment can be delayed. Nonhypertrophic cardiomyopathy LVOTO usually responds well to fluid replacement, beta blockers, and medication changes. CONCLUSIONS:: LVOTO should be suspected especially in women presenting with hypotension and systolic murmur in critical care settings. Clinical acumen and timely echocardiography are required to effectively counter this transient but potentially lethal problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)729-734
Number of pages6
JournalCritical care medicine
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Ventricular Outflow Obstruction
Critical Care
Hypotension
Systolic Murmurs
Coronary Disease
Echocardiography
Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy
Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
Dizziness
Acute Disease
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Cardiology
Cardiomyopathies
Catheterization
Atrial Fibrillation
Fatigue
Intensive Care Units
Electrocardiography
Thorax
Hemodynamics

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial nfarction
  • Hypotension
  • Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction
  • Shock

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Unexplained hypotension : The spectrum of dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in critical care settings. / Chockalingam, Anand; Dorairajan, Smrita; Bhalla, Meenakshi; Dellsperger, Kevin C.

In: Critical care medicine, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.01.2009, p. 729-734.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chockalingam, Anand ; Dorairajan, Smrita ; Bhalla, Meenakshi ; Dellsperger, Kevin C. / Unexplained hypotension : The spectrum of dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in critical care settings. In: Critical care medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 729-734.
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