Unilateral true vocal fold paralysis: Cause of right-sided lesions

C. Anthony Hughes, Sven Troost, Susan Miller, Thomas Troost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

At the Georgetown University Center for the Voice, 778 patients were referred for evaluation between July 1, 1990, and June 30, 1995. During this 5-year period, right true vocal fold paralysis or paresis was diagnosed in 24 of these patients (3%). Videostro-boscopy, voice analysis, and patient records were reviewed. Ages ranged from 23 to 80 years, and sex distribution approximated a 1:1 ratio. The patients presenting symptoms included hoarseness, dysphagia, choking, voice pitch change, voice weakness, fatigability, and breathiness. Sources of the vocal fold dysfunction included iatrogenic, traumatic, central, and infectious causes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)678-680
Number of pages3
JournalOtolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
Volume122
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2000

Fingerprint

Vocal Cords
Paralysis
Hoarseness
Sex Distribution
Paresis
Airway Obstruction
Deglutition Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Unilateral true vocal fold paralysis : Cause of right-sided lesions. / Hughes, C. Anthony; Troost, Sven; Miller, Susan; Troost, Thomas.

In: Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 122, No. 5, 05.2000, p. 678-680.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hughes, C. Anthony ; Troost, Sven ; Miller, Susan ; Troost, Thomas. / Unilateral true vocal fold paralysis : Cause of right-sided lesions. In: Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. 2000 ; Vol. 122, No. 5. pp. 678-680.
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